Ron Paul - News from Politicians - http://ronpaul.govne.ws/ Press releases, blog posts, photos, videos, and more from the politicians and candidates you select. News en-us <![CDATA[https://youtube.com/devicesupport]]> Fri, 17 Apr 2015 11:23:22 CDT
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<![CDATA[Congressman Ron Paul's Farewell Speech to Congress]]> Wed, 14 Nov 2012 17:00:28 CST
Congressman Paul's final speech on the House floor before leaving Congress
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<![CDATA[Ron Paul Hearing on the Fed's Inflationary Monetary Policy -- 3/17/11]]> Wed, 14 Nov 2012 13:03:48 CST
This hearing, entitled "The Relationship of Monetary Policy and Rising Prices," examined the Federal Reserve's easy money policies and their impact on inflation and rising prices. Witnesses: • Mr. Lewis E. Lehrman, Senior Partner, LE Lehrman & Co. • Mr. James Grant, Editor, Grant's Interest Rate Observer • Professor Joseph T. Salerno, Pace University
Views: 468
33 ratings
Time: 01:25:26 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Ron Paul Questions Ben Bernanke -- 3/2/11]]> Wed, 14 Nov 2012 11:02:36 CST
Ron Paul questioned Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke at the semi-annual Humphrey Hawkins Hearing before the House Financial Services Committee. Witness: Hon. Ben Bernanke, Chairman, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
Views: 145
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Time: 08:11 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Ron Paul Hearing on the Fed's Impact on Labor Markets -- 2/9/11]]> Wed, 14 Nov 2012 10:20:31 CST
This hearing, entitled "Can Monetary Policy Really Create Jobs?", examined the impact of the Federal Reserve's monetary policy decisions on job creation and the unemployment rate. Witnesses: Thomas J. DiLorenzo, Ph.D., Professor of Economics, Sellinger School of Business, Loyola University Richard Vedder, Ph.D., Professor of Economics, Ohio University Josh Bivens, Ph.D., Economist, Economic Policy Institute
Views: 109
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Time: 02:10:57 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Hearing on the Price of Money Sept 21, 2012]]> Fri, 21 Sep 2012 16:55:39 CDT
United States House of Representatives Committee on Financial Services Subcommittee on Domestic Monetary Policy Hearing on "The Price of Money: Consequences of the Federal Reserve's Zero Interest Rate Policy" September 21, 2012
Views: 192
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Time: 01:03:11 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Ron Paul Hearing on the Fed's Manipulation of Interest Rates -- 9/21/12]]> Fri, 21 Sep 2012 16:55:39 CDT
This hearing of the Domestic Monetary Policy Subcommittee examined: (1) the effects of interest rates on inflation and the purchasing power of the dollar; (2) the role of interest rates in resource allocation, economic growth, and economic crises; and (3) the impact of the Federal Reserve's zero interest rate policy on investors, savers, and the economy. The hearing was held on Friday, September 21, 2012, at 9:30 am in Room 2128 of the Rayburn House Office Building and was titled, "The Price of Money: Consequences of the Federal Reserve's Zero Interest Rate Policy." Witnesses: § Mr. James Grant, Editor, Grant's Interest Rate Observer
Views: 18211
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Time: 01:03:11 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Ron Paul Lecture - "The Great Enabler: The Rise of the Federal Reserve and the Growth of Government"]]> Tue, 04 Sep 2012 11:32:30 CDT
Congressman Ron Paul delivered this Congressional lecture on "The Great Enabler: The Rise of the Federal Reserve and the Growth of Government." The introduction was given by Senator Rand Paul. As a continuing educational tool this lecture was filmed and is provided to the public. Congressman Paul explains in this lecture the Federal Reserve's role as the enabler of big government. Through purchases of government debt, the Fed allows the government to spend beyond its means and contributes to the growth of the welfare-warfare state. If leviathan government is to be countered, understanding monetary policy and the fundamental role it plays in the relentless growth of government is a necessary first step. Other lectures in the Fed series: Pt. 1: Why Was the Fed Created? -- www.youtube.com Pt. 2: What Does the Fed Do? -- www.youtube.com Pt. 3: What Is the Fed's Future? -- www.youtube.com Related: Ron Paul Money Lecture Series Pt. 1: "What is Money" -- www.youtube.com Pt. 2: "What is Constitutional Money?" www.youtube.com Pt. 3: "What About Money Causes Economic Crises?" -- www.youtube.com
Views: 245
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Time: 55:01 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Ron Paul Lecture - "The Great Enabler: The Rise of the Federal Reserve and the Growth of Government"]]> Tue, 04 Sep 2012 10:44:15 CDT
Congressman Ron Paul delivered this Congressional lecture on "The Great Enabler: The Rise of the Federal Reserve and the Growth of Government." The introduction was given by Senator Rand Paul. As a continuing educational tool this lecture was filmed and is provided to the public. Congressman Paul explains in this lecture the Federal Reserve's role as the enabler of big government. Through purchases of government debt, the Fed allows the government to spend beyond its means and contributes to the growth of the welfare-warfare state. If leviathan government is to be countered, understanding monetary policy and the fundamental role it plays in the relentless growth of government is a necessary first step. Other lectures in the Fed series: Pt. 1: Why Was the Fed Created? -- www.youtube.com Pt. 2: What Does the Fed Do? -- www.youtube.com Pt. 3: What Is the Fed's Future? -- www.youtube.com Related: Ron Paul Money Lecture Series Pt. 1: "What is Money" -- www.youtube.com Pt. 2: "What is Constitutional Money?" www.youtube.com Pt. 3: "What About Money Causes Economic Crises?" -- www.youtube.com
Views: 69
12 ratings
Time: 55:01 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA["What is the Fed's Future?" with Roger Garrison -- Ron Paul Fed Lecture Series, Pt 3/3]]> Wed, 15 Aug 2012 14:58:50 CDT
Rep. Ron Paul sponsored this Congressional lecture on "What Is the Fed's Future?", the final lecture in a three part series on the Federal Reserve System for Congressional staff. As a continuing educational tool this lecture was filmed and is provided to the public. The lecture was delivered by Dr. Roger Garrison, Professor Emeritus of Economics at Auburn University. Dr. Garrison's lecture describes how the economic precepts on which the Fed operates are fundamentally flawed, making it only a matter of time before the Fed is the creator of its own demise. By contrasting the Keynesian macroeconomic theory upon which the Fed is based with the Austrian macroeconomic theory, what Garrison calls the capital-based framework, Dr. Garrison illustrates the market-distorting effects of the Fed's actions on the structure of production. Using this comparison, Professor Garrison provides a simple yet comprehensive explanation of how the Fed's monetary policy actions created the housing bubble and the subsequent financial crisis. He concludes by highlighting the bleak future for the Fed's ability to manage the economy, and emphasizes the necessity of decentralized banking. Other lectures in the Fed series: Pt. 1: "Why Was the Fed Created?" -- www.youtube.com Pt. 2: "What Does the Fed Do?" -- www.youtube.com Related: Ron Paul Money Lecture Series Pt. 1: "What Is Money?" -- www.youtube.com Pt. 2: "What Is Constitutional Money?" -- www.youtube.com Pt. 3: "What About Money Causes Economic <b>...</b>
Views: 26
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Time: 59:51 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA["What is the Fed's Future?" with Roger Garrison -- Ron Paul Fed Lecture Series, Pt 3/3]]> Tue, 14 Aug 2012 16:47:32 CDT
Rep. Ron Paul sponsored this Congressional lecture on "What Is the Fed's Future?", the final lecture in a three part series on the Federal Reserve System for Congressional staff. As a continuing educational tool this lecture was filmed and is provided to the public. The lecture was delivered by Dr. Roger Garrison, Professor Emeritus of Economics at Auburn University. Dr. Garrison's lecture describes how the economic precepts on which the Fed operates are fundamentally flawed, making it only a matter of time before the Fed is the creator of its own demise. By contrasting the Keynesian macroeconomic theory upon which the Fed is based with the Austrian macroeconomic theory, what Garrison calls the capital-based framework, Dr. Garrison illustrates the market-distorting effects of the Fed's actions on the structure of production. Using this comparison, Professor Garrison provides a simple yet comprehensive explanation of how the Fed's monetary policy actions created the housing bubble and the subsequent financial crisis. He concludes by highlighting the bleak future for the Fed's ability to manage the economy, and emphasizes the necessity of decentralized banking. Other lectures in the Fed series: Pt. 1: "Why Was the Fed Created?" -- www.youtube.com Pt. 2: "What Does the Fed Do?" -- www.youtube.com Related: Ron Paul Money Lecture Series Pt. 1: "What Is Money?" -- www.youtube.com Pt. 2: "What Is Constitutional Money?" -- www.youtube.com Pt. 3: "What About Money Causes Economic <b>...</b>
Views: 31
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<![CDATA[Congressman Ron Paul's Opening Statement - Domestic Monetary Policy Subcommittee]]> Thu, 02 Aug 2012 18:12:00 CDT
Congressman Paul gives his opening statement for the final Domestic Monetary Policy subcommittee hearing under his chairmanship on August 2nd 2012.
Views: 303
122 ratings
Time: 06:27 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Congressman Ron Paul's Final Domestic Monetary Policy Subcommittee Hearing]]> Thu, 02 Aug 2012 17:38:04 CDT
Congressman Paul's subcommittee met on August 2nd, 2012 to examine sound money and parallel currencies.
Views: 228
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Time: 01:04:26 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Ron Paul Hearing on Sound Money and the Road to Monetary Freedom -- 8/2/12]]> Thu, 02 Aug 2012 17:38:04 CDT
This hearing of the Domestic Monetary Policy Subcommittee examined: (1) parallel currencies and alternative forms of money; (2) the effects of parallel currencies on the economy and monetary policy; and (3) obstacles that prevent the circulation of alternative forms of money. The hearing was held on Thursday, August 2, 2012, at 10 am in Room 2128 of the Rayburn House Office Building and was titled, "Sound Money: Parallel Currencies and the Roadmap to Monetary Freedom." Witnesses: § Dr. Richard Ebeling, Professor of Economics, Northwood University § Mr. Nathan Lewis, Principal, Kiku Capital Management LLC § Mr. Rob Gray, Executive Director, The American Open Currency Standard
Views: 12435
341 ratings
Time: 01:04:26 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Congressman Ron Paul on CNBC's "Closing Bell" with Maria Bartiromo Aug 1, 2012]]> Wed, 01 Aug 2012 18:22:59 CDT
Congressman Ron Paul discusses the Federal Reserve on CNBC's "Closing Bell" with Maria Bartiromo on August 1, 2012.
Views: 216
86 ratings
Time: 07:57 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Congressman Ron Paul's Speech Against Iran Sanctions August 1, 2012]]> Wed, 01 Aug 2012 15:54:18 CDT
Congressman Ron Paul's floor speech against Iran Sanctions bill on August 1, 2012.
Views: 1350
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Time: 05:57 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Congressman Ron Paul on Bloomberg News July 25, 2012]]> Wed, 25 Jul 2012 18:13:21 CDT
Congressman Ron Paul on Bloomberg News discussing Audit the Fed bill passage by the House on July 25, 2012.
Views: 14
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Time: 07:28 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Congressman Ron Paul grills Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke]]> Wed, 25 Jul 2012 13:02:10 CDT
Congressman Ron Paul grills Chairman Ben Bernanke on Fed transparency in a House Financial Services Committee Hearing on July 18, 2012.
Views: 295
82 ratings
Time: 05:22 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Congressman Ron Paul grills Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke]]> Wed, 25 Jul 2012 11:54:58 CDT
Congressman Ron Paul grills Chairman Ben Bernanke on transparency of the Federal Reserve during House Financial Services Committee Hearing on July 18, 2012.
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<![CDATA[Congressman Ron Paul's Floor Speech on Audit the Fed July 24, 2012]]> Wed, 25 Jul 2012 10:16:09 CDT
Congressman Ron Paul discussed HR 459, Audit the Fed bill, on July 24, 2012.
Views: 14
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Time: 02:36 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Congressman Ron Paul on C-SPAN Washington Journal July 24 2012]]> Tue, 24 Jul 2012 18:35:31 CDT
Congressman Ron Paul discusses the Federal Reserve and takes questions from callers on C-SPAN Washington Journal.
Views: 192
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Time: 46:19 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Congressman Ron Paul on FOX Business "After the Bell" Jul 19 2012]]> Thu, 19 Jul 2012 18:29:58 CDT
Congressman Ron Paul interviewed by David Asman and Liz Claman on FOX Business "After the Bell" on July 19, 2012.
Views: 33
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<![CDATA[Congressman Ron Paul Urges Afghanistan Withdrawal July 18 2012]]> Wed, 18 Jul 2012 18:23:44 CDT
Congressman Ron Paul urges withdrawal from Afghanistan during Defense Appropriations debate on July 18, 2012.
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Time: 04:45 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Financial Services Hearing Highlights July 17 2012]]> Wed, 18 Jul 2012 18:00:35 CDT
Congressman Ron Paul gives an opening statement and questions Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke for the last time on July 17, 2012.
Views: 982
153 ratings
Time: 15:50 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Ron Paul Grills Ben Bernanke -- 7/18/12]]> Wed, 18 Jul 2012 18:00:35 CDT
Congressman Ron Paul gives an opening statement and questions Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke for the last time at the semi-annual Humphrey-Hawkins hearing before the House Financial Services Committee. The hearing was held on Wednesday, July 18, 2012, at 10 am in Room 2128 of the Rayburn House Office Building and was titled, "Monetary Policy and the State of the Economy."
Views: 3830
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Time: 15:50 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Hearing June 28 2012 Fractional Reserve Banking]]> Fri, 29 Jun 2012 10:29:52 CDT
This hearing, entitled "Fractional Reserve Banking and the Federal Reserve: The Economic Consequences of High-Powered Money," will be held on Thursday, June 28, at 2:00 pm in room 2128 of the Rayburn House Office Building. Witnesses scheduled to testify: Dr. John Cochran, Emeritus Professor of Economics and Emeritus Dean, School of Business, Metropolitan State College of Denver Dr. Joseph Salerno, Professor of Economics, Lubin School of Business, Pace University Dr. Lawrence H. White, Professors of Economics, George Mason University "Fractional reserve banking underpins the entire banking system, yet its effects on society are completely ignored. Our financial system consists of vast amounts of credit pyramided on top of very small amounts of real savings-- all backstopped by explicit and implicit government guarantees. This poses significant risks to the stability of the economy and monetary system, which ought to give pause to any serious observer of financial markets. Hopefully this hearing will create a greater understanding among the American people about the nature of the banking system, and begin the movement towards serious systematic reform. The American people deserve a financial system that is stable and efficient; one that operates without taxpayer subsidies and bailouts." - Congressman Ron Paul
Views: 5945
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Time: 01:12:02 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Ron Paul Hearing on Fractional Reserve Banking and High-Powered Money -- 6/28/12]]> Fri, 29 Jun 2012 10:29:52 CDT
This hearing of the Domestic Monetary Policy Subcommittee examined fractional reserve banking, its relationship to monetary policy, and its effect on the economy. The hearing was held on Thursday, June 28, 2012, at 2 pm in Room 2128 of the Rayburn House Office Building and was titled, "Fractional Reserve Banking and the Federal Reserve: The Economic Consequences of High-Powered Money." Witnesses: § Dr. John Cochran, Emeritus Professor of Economics and Emeritus Dean, School of Business, Metropolitan State College of Denver § Dr. Joseph Salerno, Professor of Economics, Lubin School of Business, Pace University § Dr. Lawrence H. White, Professor of Economics, George Mason University "Fractional reserve banking underpins the entire banking system, yet its effects on society are completely ignored. Our financial system consists of vast amounts of credit pyramided on top of very small amounts of real savings--all backstopped by explicit and implicit government guarantees. This poses significant risks to the stability of the economy and monetary system, which ought to give pause to any serious observer of financial markets. Hopefully this hearing will create a greater understanding among the American people about the nature of the banking system, and begin the movement towards serious systematic reform. The American people deserve a financial system that is stable and efficient; one that operates without taxpayer subsidies and bailouts." - Congressman Ron Paul
Views: 18223
493 ratings
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<![CDATA[Congressman Paul on Cavuto]]> Wed, 27 Jun 2012 16:41:28 CDT
Congressman Paul weighs in on healthcare ahead of the Supreme Court's decision
Views: 6865
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Time: 06:44 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[June 27 2012 Floor Speech on Syria]]> Wed, 27 Jun 2012 11:08:11 CDT
Congressman Ron Paul speaks about the latest events in Syria and warns against intervention
Views: 4836
340 ratings
Time: 04:54 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Floor Speech, Syria June 19 2012]]> Tue, 19 Jun 2012 12:29:28 CDT
Congressman Paul on intervention in Syria Full text: When Will We Attack Syria? Plans, rumors, and war propaganda for attacking Syria and deposing Assad have been around for many months. This past week however, it was reported that the Pentagon indeed has finalized plans to do just that. In my opinion, all the evidence to justify this attack is bogus. It is no more credible than the pretext given for the 2003 invasion of Iraq or the 2011 attack on Libya. The total waste of those wars should cause us to pause before this all-out effort at occupation and regime change is initiated against Syria. There are no national security concerns that require such a foolish escalation of violence in the Middle East. There should be no doubt that our security interests are best served by completely staying out of the internal strife now raging in Syria. We are already too much involved in supporting the forces within Syria anxious to overthrow the current government. Without outside interference, the strife—now characterized as a civil war—would likely be non-existent. Whether or not we attack yet another country, occupying it and setting up a new regime that we hope we can control poses a serious Constitutional question: From where does a president get such authority? Since World War II the proper authority to go to war has been ignored. It has been replaced by international entities like the United Nations and NATO, or the President himself, while ignoring the Congress. And sadly, the <b>...</b>
Views: 301
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Time: 05:29 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Ron Paul Hearing on The Fed: Mend It or End It? PART 2 -- 5/8/12]]> Thu, 10 May 2012 16:39:12 CDT
Part 2 of a Domestic Monetary Policy Subcommittee hearing that discussed both reform and abolition of the Federal Reserve System and examined six legislative proposals: § HR 245, To amend the Federal Reserve Act to remove the mandate on the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and the Federal Open Market Committee to focus on maximum employment, introduced by Rep. Mike Pence; § HR 1094, Federal Reserve Board Abolition Act, introduced by Rep. Ron Paul; § HR 1401, Democratizing the Federal Reserve System Act of 2011, introduced by Rep. Marcy Kaptur; § HR 2990, National Emergency Employment Defense Act of 2011, introduced by Rep. Dennis Kucinich; § HR 3428, To amend the Federal Reserve Act to replace the Federal Open Market Committee members representing the Federal Reserve banks with additional members appointed by the President, and for other purposes, introduced by Rep. Barney Frank; and § HR 4180, Sound Dollar Act of 2012, introduced by Rep. Kevin Brady. The hearing was held on Tuesday, May 8, 2012, at 10 am in Room 2128 of the Rayburn House Office Building. Witnesses: Panel I § The Honorable Kevin Brady (R-TX) § The Honorable Barney Frank (D-MA) Panel II § Dr. Jeffrey M. Herbener, Chairman, Economics Department, Grove City College § Dr. Peter G. Klein, Associate Professor, Applied Social Sciences and Director, McQuinn Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership, University of Missouri § Dr. John B. Taylor, Mary and Robert Raymond Professor of Economics, Stanford <b>...</b>
Views: 9334
176 ratings
Time: 01:11:55 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Congressman Paul Subcommittee Hearing "The Federal Reserve System: Mend It or End It?" PART 2]]> Thu, 10 May 2012 16:23:06 CDT
This hearing examines a number of legislative proposals to reform, replace, or abolish the Federal Reserve System. "More and more people are beginning to understand just how destructive the Federal Reserve's monetary policy has been," said Chairman Paul. "I hope that this hearing will kickstart a serious discussion on the need to rein in the Fed. 100 years is far too long for Congress to have taken a hands-off approach," Paul continued. "The Fed continues to reward Wall Street banks while destroying the dollar's purchasing power and driving up the cost of living for average Americans. This reckless behavior must come to an end" The hearing was held on Tuesday, May 8th, at 10:00 am in room 2128 of the Rayburn House Office Building. Panel II • Dr. Jeffrey M. Herbener, Chairman, Economics Department, Grove City College • Dr. Peter G. Klein, Associate Professor, Applied Social Sciences and Director, McQuinn Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership, University of Missouri • Dr. John B. Taylor, Mary and Robert Raymond Professor of Economics, Stanford University and George P. Schultz Senior Fellow in Economics, Hoover Institution • Dr. Alice Rivlin, Senior Fellow, Economic Studies, Brookings Institution, and former Vice Chair, Federal Reserve Board of Governors • Dr. James K. Galbraith, Lloyd M. Bentsen, Jr. Chair in Government/Business Relations, LBJ School of Public Affairs, University of Texas at Austin
Views: 203
22 ratings
Time: 01:11:55 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Ron Paul Hearing on The Fed: Mend It or End It? PART 1 -- 5/8/12]]> Thu, 10 May 2012 15:32:15 CDT
Part 1 of a Domestic Monetary Policy Subcommittee hearing that discussed both reform and abolition of the Federal Reserve System and examined six legislative proposals: § HR 245, To amend the Federal Reserve Act to remove the mandate on the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and the Federal Open Market Committee to focus on maximum employment, introduced by Rep. Mike Pence; § HR 1094, Federal Reserve Board Abolition Act, introduced by Rep. Ron Paul; § HR 1401, Democratizing the Federal Reserve System Act of 2011, introduced by Rep. Marcy Kaptur; § HR 2990, National Emergency Employment Defense Act of 2011, introduced by Rep. Dennis Kucinich; § HR 3428, To amend the Federal Reserve Act to replace the Federal Open Market Committee members representing the Federal Reserve banks with additional members appointed by the President, and for other purposes, introduced by Rep. Barney Frank; and § HR 4180, Sound Dollar Act of 2012, introduced by Rep. Kevin Brady. The hearing was held on Tuesday, May 8, 2012, at 10 am in Room 2128 of the Rayburn House Office Building. Witnesses: Panel I § The Honorable Kevin Brady (R-TX) § The Honorable Barney Frank (D-MA) Panel II § Dr. Jeffrey M. Herbener, Chairman, Economics Department, Grove City College § Dr. Peter G. Klein, Associate Professor, Applied Social Sciences and Director, McQuinn Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership, University of Missouri § Dr. John B. Taylor, Mary and Robert Raymond Professor of Economics, Stanford <b>...</b>
Views: 23780
416 ratings
Time: 01:06:53 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Congressman Paul Subcommittee Hearing "The Federal Reserve System: Mend It or End It?" PART 1]]> Thu, 10 May 2012 15:10:45 CDT
This hearing examines a number of legislative proposals to reform, replace, or abolish the Federal Reserve System. "More and more people are beginning to understand just how destructive the Federal Reserve's monetary policy has been," said Chairman Paul. "I hope that this hearing will kickstart a serious discussion on the need to rein in the Fed. 100 years is far too long for Congress to have taken a hands-off approach," Paul continued. "The Fed continues to reward Wall Street banks while destroying the dollar's purchasing power and driving up the cost of living for average Americans. This reckless behavior must come to an end" The hearing was held on Tuesday, May 8th, at 10:00 am in room 2128 of the Rayburn House Office Building. Witnesses to include: Panel I • Representative Kevin Brady (R-TX) • Representative Barney Frank (D-MA) Please also see Part 2 with: • Dr. Jeffrey M. Herbener, Chairman, Economics Department, Grove City College • Dr. Peter G. Klein, Associate Professor, Applied Social Sciences and Director, McQuinn Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership, University of Missouri • Dr. John B. Taylor, Mary and Robert Raymond Professor of Economics, Stanford University and George P. Schultz Senior Fellow in Economics, Hoover Institution • Dr. Alice Rivlin, Senior Fellow, Economic Studies, Brookings Institution, and former Vice Chair, Federal Reserve Board of Governors • Dr. James K. Galbraith, Lloyd M. Bentsen, Jr. Chair in Government/Business Relations, LBJ School of <b>...</b>
Views: 509
51 ratings
Time: 01:06:53 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Congressman Paul Subcommittee Hearing "The Federal Reserve System: Mend It or End It?" PART 2]]> Wed, 09 May 2012 11:31:48 CDT
This hearing examines a number of legislative proposals to reform, replace, or abolish the Federal Reserve System. "More and more people are beginning to understand just how destructive the Federal Reserve's monetary policy has been," said Chairman Paul. "I hope that this hearing will kickstart a serious discussion on the need to rein in the Fed. 100 years is far too long for Congress to have taken a hands-off approach," Paul continued. "The Fed continues to reward Wall Street banks while destroying the dollar's purchasing power and driving up the cost of living for average Americans. This reckless behavior must come to an end" The hearing was held on Tuesday, May 8th, at 10:00 am in room 2128 of the Rayburn House Office Building. Panel II • Dr. Jeffrey M. Herbener, Chairman, Economics Department, Grove City College • Dr. Peter G. Klein, Associate Professor, Applied Social Sciences and Director, McQuinn Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership, University of Missouri • Dr. John B. Taylor, Mary and Robert Raymond Professor of Economics, Stanford University and George P. Schultz Senior Fellow in Economics, Hoover Institution • Dr. Alice Rivlin, Senior Fellow, Economic Studies, Brookings Institution, and former Vice Chair, Federal Reserve Board of Governors • Dr. James K. Galbraith, Lloyd M. Bentsen, Jr. Chair in Government/Business Relations, LBJ School of Public Affairs, University of Texas at Austin
Views: 1208
86 ratings
Time: 01:12:00 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Congressman Paul Subcommittee Hearing "The Federal Reserve System: Mend It or End It?" PART 1]]> Wed, 09 May 2012 11:16:44 CDT
This hearing examines a number of legislative proposals to reform, replace, or abolish the Federal Reserve System. "More and more people are beginning to understand just how destructive the Federal Reserve's monetary policy has been," said Chairman Paul. "I hope that this hearing will kickstart a serious discussion on the need to rein in the Fed. 100 years is far too long for Congress to have taken a hands-off approach," Paul continued. "The Fed continues to reward Wall Street banks while destroying the dollar's purchasing power and driving up the cost of living for average Americans. This reckless behavior must come to an end" The hearing was held on Tuesday, May 8th, at 10:00 am in room 2128 of the Rayburn House Office Building. Witnesses to include: Panel I • Representative Kevin Brady (R-TX) • Representative Barney Frank (D-MA) Please also see Part 2 with: • Dr. Jeffrey M. Herbener, Chairman, Economics Department, Grove City College • Dr. Peter G. Klein, Associate Professor, Applied Social Sciences and Director, McQuinn Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership, University of Missouri • Dr. John B. Taylor, Mary and Robert Raymond Professor of Economics, Stanford University and George P. Schultz Senior Fellow in Economics, Hoover Institution • Dr. Alice Rivlin, Senior Fellow, Economic Studies, Brookings Institution, and former Vice Chair, Federal Reserve Board of Governors • Dr. James K. Galbraith, Lloyd M. Bentsen, Jr. Chair in Government/Business Relations, LBJ School of <b>...</b>
Views: 12
2 ratings
Time: 01:08:04 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Ron Paul Hearing on the Fed's Bailout of the Euro -- 3/27/12]]> Tue, 27 Mar 2012 15:30:45 CDT
This hearing of the Domestic Monetary Policy Subcommittee focused on the Federal Reserve's bailout of the Eurozone and its impact on the US economy, the monetary system, and the dollar. Particular attention was given to the Fed's central bank liquidity swap lines with the European Central Bank, which exchanged dollars for euros at extremely low rates without collateral. The hearing was held on Tuesday, March 27, 2012, at 10 am in Room 2128 of the Rayburn House Office Building and was titled, "Federal Reserve Aid to the Eurozone: Its Impact on the US and the Dollar." Witnesses: § William C. Dudley, President and Chief Executive Officer, Federal Reserve Bank of New York § Steven B. Kamin, Director, Division of International Finance, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
Views: 14445
336 ratings
Time: 01:39:20 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[DMP Eurozone Bailout Hearing.wmv]]> Tue, 27 Mar 2012 14:31:31 CDT
This hearing of the Domestic Monetary Policy and Technology Subcommittee examines the Federal Reserve's assistance to the Eurozone and the impact of that assistance on the US monetary system and the dollar. It was held on Tuesday, March 27, at 10:00 am in Room 2128 of the Rayburn House Office Building. Witnesses: · William Dudley, President & CEO, Federal Reserve Bank of New York · Steven B. Kamin, Director, Division of International Finance, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
Views: 136
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Time: 01:39:20 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA["What Does the Fed Do?" with James Grant -- Ron Paul Fed Lecture Series, Pt 2/3]]> Fri, 23 Mar 2012 14:38:00 CDT
Rep. Ron Paul sponsored this Congressional lecture on "What Does the Fed Do?", the second lecture in a three part series on the Federal Reserve System for Congressional staff. As a continuing educational tool this lecture was filmed and is provided to the public. The lecture was delivered by James Grant, founder and editor of Grant's Interest Rate Observer and a frequent commentator on financial news networks. Mr. Grant's lecture summarizes the methods the Federal Reserve uses in its attempt to manage the economy through the conduct of monetary policy, dissecting the euphemistic language behind the Fed's actions and describing in detail the problems with the Fed's endeavor to be an "economic seer." Mr. Grant also bridges the gap between the lectures on the pre-Fed era and the Fed's future by describing the evolution of the Fed over its one hundred year history. Other lectures in the Fed series: Pt. 1: Why Was the Fed Created? -- www.youtube.com Pt. 3: What is the Fed's Future? -- available May 2012 Related: Ron Paul Money Lecture Series Pt. 1: "What is Money" -- www.youtube.com Pt. 2: "What is Constitutional Money?" www.youtube.com Pt. 3: "What About Money Causes Economic Crises?" -- www.youtube.com
Views: 166
20 ratings
Time: 01:03:41 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA["Why Was the Fed Created?" with George Selgin -- Ron Paul Fed Lecture Series, Pt 1/3]]> Fri, 02 Mar 2012 15:34:39 CST
Rep. Ron Paul sponsored this Congressional lecture on "Why Was the Federal Reserve Created?", the introductory lecture in a three part series on the Federal Reserve System for Congressional staff. As a continuing educational tool this lecture was filmed and is provided to the public. The lecture was delivered by Dr. George Selgin, Professor of Economics at the Terry School of Business at the University of Georgia and author of a number of books on money and banking, such as "Bank Deregulation and Monetary Order" and "Good Money." Prof. Selgin provides a short but comprehensive explanation of the institutional drawbacks of the United States banking system during the 19th century and how this fueled desire for financial reform. Unfortunately, as Prof. Selgin goes on to describe, the solution of allowing a free market in banking was rejected and instead another layer of government regulation was placed on the banking sector in the form of the Federal Reserve System. Other lectures in the Fed series to follow: Pt. 2: What Does the Fed Do? -- available late March 2012 Pt. 3: What is the Fed's Future? -- available May 2012 Related: Ron Paul Money Lecture Series Pt. 1: "What is Money" -- www.youtube.com Pt. 2: "What is Constitutional Money?" www.youtube.com Pt. 3: "What About Money Causes Economic Crises?" -- www.youtube.com
Views: 4546
259 ratings
Time: 52:30 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Foreign Affairs Hearing Feb 29 2012]]> Wed, 29 Feb 2012 14:47:03 CST
Congressman Paul questions Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on recent events in Afghanistan and Iran.
Views: 13049
316 ratings
Time: 05:50 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Financial Services Hearing Highlights Feb 29 2012]]> Wed, 29 Feb 2012 11:57:27 CST
Congressman Paul gives and opening statement and questions Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke
Views: 48841
1223 ratings
Time: 09:12 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Speech Against Raising the Debt Ceiling Jan 18 2012]]> Wed, 18 Jan 2012 17:23:30 CST
House floor speech on the debt ceiling dissapproval resolution, HJ Res. 98.
Views: 304
359 ratings
Time: 04:15 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[NDAA Floor Speech Jan 18 2012]]> Wed, 18 Jan 2012 13:05:02 CST
House floor speech on the unconstitutional provisions of the NDAA bill.
Views: 302
652 ratings
Time: 06:27 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[FinalTeaLecture]]> Mon, 19 Dec 2011 16:07:42 CST
Views: 217
42 ratings
Time: 01:10:31 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA["What About Money Causes Economic Crises?" with Peter Schiff - Ron Paul Money Lecture Series, Pt 3/3]]> Mon, 19 Dec 2011 16:07:42 CST
Rep. Ron Paul sponsored this Congressional lecture on "What About Money Causes Economic Crises?", the concluding lecture in a three part series on the basic principles of money for Congressional staff. As a continuing educational tool this lecture was filmed and is provided to the public. The lecture was delivered by Peter Schiff, CEO of Euro Pacific Capital and author of Crash Proof: How to Profit From the Coming Economic Collapse and How an Economy Grows and Why It Crashes. Mr. Schiff explains the fact that the interest rate is a price and that manipulation of that price results in real changes to the capital structure and structure of production within the economy, causing imbalances, booms, and eventually busts in the economy. His lecture also explores how government intervention through labor and employment policies results in diminished employment and an overall reduction in the standard of living. Previous videos in this lecture series can be found here: Pt. 1: "What is Money?" -- www.youtube.com Pt. 2: "What Is Constitutional Money?" -- www.youtube.com
Views: 301
65 ratings
Time: 01:10:31 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA["What is Constitutional Money?" with Edwin Vieira -- Ron Paul Money Lecture Series, Pt 2/3]]> Fri, 18 Nov 2011 10:06:59 CST
Rep. Ron Paul sponsored this Congressional lecture on "What is Constitutional Money?", part two of a three part series on the basic principles of money for Congressional staff. As a continuing educational tool this lecture was filmed and is provided to the public. The lecture was delivered by Edwin Vieira, Jr., JD, Ph.D, the author of the definitive work on Constitutional money, Pieces of Eight: The Monetary Powers and Disabilities of the United States Constitution. Dr. Vieira's lecture explores the development of the American monetary system from colonial times through the creation of the Federal Reserve System, explaining the constitutional underpinnings of our money and the erosion of that legal framework over 200+ years of monetary history. He also explains his plan to return to sound money, outlining the grim ramifications of continuing on a fiat money standard. Part 1 www.youtube.com
Views: 1
0 ratings
Time: 01:01:57 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Office of Congressman Ron Paul Money Lecture Series -- "What is Money?" with Joseph T. Salerno]]> Thu, 20 Oct 2011 15:29:53 CDT
Rep. Ron Paul sponsored this Congressional lecture on "What is Money?", part one of a three part series on the basic principles of money for Congressional staff. As a continuing educational tool this lecture was filmed and is provided to the public. Joseph T. Salerno, Ph.D., delivered the lecture. He is academic vice president of the Mises Institute, professor of economics at Pace University, and editor of the Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics. Pt. 2: "What is Constitutional Money?" -- available November 2011 Pt. 3 "What About Money Causes Economic Crises?" -- available December 2011
Views: 172
19 ratings
Time: 53:59 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA["What is Money?" with Joseph T. Salerno -- Ron Paul Money Lecture Series, Pt 1/3]]> Thu, 20 Oct 2011 15:29:53 CDT
Rep. Ron Paul sponsored this Congressional lecture on "What is Money?", part one of a three part series on the basic principles of money for Congressional staff. As a continuing educational tool this lecture was filmed and is provided to the public. Joseph T. Salerno, Ph.D., delivered the lecture. He is academic vice president of the Mises Institute, professor of economics at Pace University, and editor of the Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics. Pt. 2: "What is Constitutional Money?" www.youtube.com Pt. 3 "What About Money Causes Economic Crises?" -- available December 2011
Views: 11210
284 ratings
Time: 53:59 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Freedom Watch Oct 4 2011]]> Wed, 05 Oct 2011 10:52:20 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses Al-Awlaki, the Fed and the economy with Judge Napolitano.
Views: 472
59 ratings
Time: 08:57 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Fed Audit Hearing Oct 4 2011]]> Tue, 04 Oct 2011 14:41:17 CDT
Panel I: Orice Williams Brown, Managing Director, Financial Markets and Community Investment, Government Accountability Office Panel II: Robert D. Auerbach, Professor of Public Affairs, Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, University of Texas, Austin Mark A. Calabria, Director of Financial Regulation Studies, Cato Institute
Views: 136
23 ratings
Time: 01:33:21 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Mutually Assured Destruction vs Mutually Assured Respect]]> Thu, 15 Sep 2011 14:30:46 CDT
Ron Paul discusses his foreign policy views. Full text available at www.house.gov/paul
Views: 39
9 ratings
Time: 06:57 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Cavuto Sept 14 2011]]> Wed, 14 Sep 2011 16:36:38 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses Solyndra, Cheney and Iran with Neil Cavuto
Views: 0
0 ratings
Time: 06:15 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Hearing on Sound Money Sept 13 2011]]> Wed, 14 Sep 2011 10:38:57 CDT
The hearing, entitled "Road Map to Sound Money: A Legislative Hearing on HR 1098 and Restoring the Dollar," was held on Tuesday, September 13, at 2:00 pm in Room 2128 of the Rayburn House Office Building. Witnesses: Dr. Lawrence M. Parks, Executive Director, Foundation for the Advancement of Monetary Education Dr. Lawrence H. White, Professor of Economics, George Mason University HR 1098, the Free Competition in Currency Act of 2011, would allow competitive free market forces to provide sound money through choice in currency. The bill repeals federal legal tender laws, repeals restrictions on private mints, and repeals taxes on gold and silver which prevent them from circulating as forms of payment. The hearing will discuss the need for and efficacy of sound money, the means by which sound money can be achieved through measures such as HR 1098, and the constitutional role of government in money. "For too long the Federal Reserve has exercised a monopoly on currency issuance," Chairman Paul stated. "The result, predictably, has been an increasingly devalued dollar. We have been experimenting with a pure fiat currency system nationally and internationally for 40 years, and it has been proven unsound and unsustainable. Our fiat system helped create the massive debt crisis we find ourselves in, and has eroded the purchasing power of every American. The American people deserve to have a choice of currencies to protect themselves and their families from the poor decisions of <b>...</b>
Views: 126
19 ratings
Time: 59:23 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Kudlow July 29 2011]]> Fri, 29 Jul 2011 21:40:22 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses the debt ceiling drama with Larry Kudlow
Views: 1
0 ratings
Time: 04:15 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Cavuto July 29 2011]]> Fri, 29 Jul 2011 20:57:55 CDT
Congressman Paul, along with the junior Senator from Kentucky discuss the Budget Control Act with Neil Cavuto
Views: 2
0 ratings
Time: 11:07 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[AC360 July 28 2011]]> Fri, 29 Jul 2011 10:21:16 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses the debt ceiling talks with Anderson Cooper
Views: 113
17 ratings
Time: 05:35 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Fox News July 28 2011]]> Thu, 28 Jul 2011 11:12:42 CDT
Congressman Paul suggests freezing spending rather than increasing the debt.
Views: 0
0 ratings
Time: 05:24 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Hearing July 26 2011]]> Wed, 27 Jul 2011 12:25:17 CDT
"Impact of Monetary Policy on the Economy: A Regional Fed Perspective on Inflation, Unemployment, and QE3" Tuesday, July 26, 2011 2:00 PM in 2128 Rayburn HOB Domestic Monetary Policy and Technology Witness: Dr. Thomas M. Hoenig, President, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City
Views: 1
0 ratings
Time: 01:25:52 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Floor Speech on Debt Ceiling July 19 2011]]> Tue, 19 Jul 2011 10:55:08 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses the real default...
Views: 26
3 ratings
Time: 05:12 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Financial Services Hearing July 13 2011]]> Wed, 13 Jul 2011 12:12:34 CDT
Congressman Paul gives an opening statement and questions Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke at the Humphrey Hawkins hearing before the Financial Services committee
Views: 2
0 ratings
Time: 09:53 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Scoreboard July 11 2011]]> Tue, 12 Jul 2011 10:28:37 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses the debt limit and the fed
Views: 2
0 ratings
Time: 07:13 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Libya debate June 24 2011]]> Fri, 01 Jul 2011 14:26:24 CDT
Congressman Paul during the floor debate on a resolution that would authorize the administration's Libya campaign. It was defeated 295-123
Views: 3
1 ratings
Time: 02:22 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Hearing June 22 2011]]> Fri, 24 Jun 2011 11:29:46 CDT
The hearing discusses recent audits of US gold reserves; challenges to conducting a full audit; and impediments to an accurate assessment of the US gold position, including any leases, swaps or other encumbrances placed upon the gold reserves; and also examines changes to the legislative proposal that will ensure a full and accurate audit, assay, and inventory of US gold reserves. The hearing entitled "Investigating the Gold: HR 1495, the Gold Reserve Transparency Act and the Oversight of United States Gold Holdings," was held on Thursday, June 23 at 2:00 pm in Room 2128 of the Rayburn House Office Building. Witnesses testifying: Gary T. Engel, Director, Financial Management and Assurance, Government Accountability Office Eric M. Thorson, Inspector General, Department of the Treasury
Views: 199
35 ratings
Time: 01:11:11 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Kudlow June 22 2011]]> Thu, 23 Jun 2011 17:09:21 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses the Fed and economic planning with Larry Kudlow. A one-on-one interview on newly introduced legislation to end federal prohibition of marijuana follows.
Views: 203
33 ratings
Time: 16:32 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Dylan Ratigan MSNBC June 22 2011]]> Wed, 22 Jun 2011 17:00:57 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses the troop drawdown and economics with Dylan Ratigan
Views: 10
0 ratings
Time: 05:44 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Scoreboard June 8 2011]]> Thu, 09 Jun 2011 12:42:34 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses healthcare and the economy with David Asman
Views: 6
1 ratings
Time: 08:27 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Cavuto June 1 2011]]> Fri, 03 Jun 2011 11:20:54 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses the so-called economic recovery with Neil Cavuto
Views: 124
8 ratings
Time: 12:24 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[DMP Subcommittee Hearing June 1, 2011]]> Thu, 02 Jun 2011 13:11:33 CDT
Federal Reserve Lending Disclosure: FOIA, Dodd-Frank, and the Data Dump
Views: 136
18 ratings
Time: 01:01:29 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Fox May 26 2011]]> Thu, 26 May 2011 10:55:12 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses the debt and raising the debt ceiling with Bill Hemmer on Fox News
Views: 248
46 ratings
Time: 04:50 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Libya Hearing May 25 2011]]> Wed, 25 May 2011 11:31:42 CDT
Congressman Paul in a Foreign Affairs Hearing on continued hostilities in Libya and the War Powers Resolution. Bonus Rep. Justin Amash statement in same hearing.
Views: 191
44 ratings
Time: 06:28 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[The Last Nail - Floor Speech May 25 2011]]> Wed, 25 May 2011 10:55:29 CDT
The Last Nail The last nail is being driven into the coffin of the American Republic. Yet, Congress remains in total denial as our liberties are rapidly fading before our eyes. The process is propelled by unwarranted fear and ignorance as to the true meaning of liberty. It is driven by economic myths, fallacies and irrational good intentions. The rule of law is constantly rejected and authoritarian answers are offered as panaceas for all our problems. Runaway welfarism is used to benefit the rich at the expense of the middle class. Who would have ever thought that the current generation and Congress would stand idly by and watch such a rapid disintegration of the American Republic? Characteristic of this epic event is the casual acceptance by the people and political leaders of the unitary presidency, which is equivalent to granting dictatorial powers to the President. Our Presidents can now, on their own: 1. Order assassinations, including American citizens, 2. Operate secret military tribunals, 3. Engage in torture, 4. Enforce indefinite imprisonment without due process, 5. Order searches and seizures without proper warrants, gutting the 4th Amendment, 6. Ignore the 60 day rule for reporting to the Congress the nature of any military operations as required by the War Power Resolution, 7. Continue the Patriot Act abuses without oversight, 8. Wage war at will, 9. Treat all Americans as suspected terrorists at airports with TSA groping and nude x-raying. And the Federal <b>...</b>
Views: 303
247 ratings
Time: 05:08 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[AC360 May 11 2011]]> Thu, 12 May 2011 10:55:01 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses Pakistan and bin Laden's death with Anderson Cooper
Views: 126
24 ratings
Time: 04:36 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Hearing on Monetary Policy and the Debt Ceiling]]> Wed, 11 May 2011 15:36:54 CDT
Committee on Financial Services Subcommittee on Domestic Monetary Policy Hearing on Monetary Policy and the Debt Ceiling: Examining the Relationship between the Federal Reserve and Government Debt May 11, 2011
Views: 99
10 ratings
Time: 01:33:52 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Cavuto May 4th 2011]]> Wed, 04 May 2011 16:36:32 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses bin Laden and foreign aid with Neil Cavuto. Bonus Michael Scheuer interview included.
Views: 301
67 ratings
Time: 10:12 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Floor Speech May 4 2011]]> Wed, 04 May 2011 10:25:31 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses the death of Osama bin Laden on the House floor.
Views: 1338
175 ratings
Time: 03:57 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Willis Report May 3 2011]]> Tue, 03 May 2011 17:31:06 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses news of the day with Gerri Willis
Views: 864
109 ratings
Time: 07:30 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Dylan Ratigan April 27 2011]]> Wed, 27 Apr 2011 16:53:03 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses the Fed and news of the day with Dylan Ratigan
Views: 277
41 ratings
Time: 10:38 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[CNN April 27 2011]]> Wed, 27 Apr 2011 15:32:43 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses the Fed's historic press conference and other news of the day.
Views: 307
57 ratings
Time: 06:29 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Hardball April 19 2011]]> Tue, 19 Apr 2011 21:16:45 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses wars and debt with Chris Matthews
Views: 301
53 ratings
Time: 07:41 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Lou Dobbs April 13 2011]]> Thu, 14 Apr 2011 12:03:17 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses budget issues with Lou Dobbs on Fox Business
Views: 0
0 ratings
Time: 06:33 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[AC360 April 12 2011]]> Wed, 13 Apr 2011 15:27:31 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses the budget deals with Anderson Cooper on CNN
Views: 128
19 ratings
Time: 07:50 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Hearing April 7 2011]]> Thu, 07 Apr 2011 13:07:58 CDT
Subcommittee hearing on Bullion Coin Programs at the US Mint.
Views: 3
0 ratings
Time: 01:05:07 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Dylan Ratigan April 5 2011]]> Tue, 05 Apr 2011 16:44:29 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses budget issues with Dylan Ratigan
Views: 23
2 ratings
Time: 05:08 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Bloomberg March 31 2011]]> Thu, 31 Mar 2011 15:20:35 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses the documents the Fed released by court order today.
Views: 10
0 ratings
Time: 10:59 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Floor Speech on Afghanistan March 17 2011]]> Thu, 17 Mar 2011 13:00:19 CDT
Congressman Paul urges his colleagues in Congress to bring the troops home from Afghanistan.
Views: 0
0 ratings
Time: 06:04 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Floor Speech March 10 2011]]> Thu, 10 Mar 2011 11:02:34 CST
Congressman Paul strongly cautions against military involvement in Libya, including establishing a no-fly zone.
Views: 301
108 ratings
Time: 05:25 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[CNN The Arena March 2 2011]]> Thu, 03 Mar 2011 11:14:34 CST
Congressman Paul discusses several issues with Eliot Spitzer
Views: 663
134 ratings
Time: 10:08 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Foreign Affairs Mar 1 2011]]> Tue, 01 Mar 2011 12:28:15 CST
Congressman Paul questions Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on Egypt, Libya, and supporting dictators in general.
Views: 337
197 ratings
Time: 05:29 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Larry Kudlow Feb 14 2011]]> Tue, 15 Feb 2011 17:16:23 CST
Congressman Paul talks with Larry Kudlow
Views: 180
0 ratings
Time: 09:08 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Fox News Feb 15 2011]]> Tue, 15 Feb 2011 11:16:34 CST
Congressman Paul discusses the budget and spending with Bill Hemmer
Views: 846
0 ratings
Time: 06:30 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[On the PATRIOT Act Feb 8 2011]]> Wed, 09 Feb 2011 11:22:46 CST
Congressman Paul speaks on the House floor in opposition to extending certain provisions of the PATRIOT Act.
Views: 301
0 ratings
Time: 03:35 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Cavuto Jan 31 2011]]> Mon, 31 Jan 2011 16:26:08 CST
Congressman Paul discusses the situation in Egypt with Neil Cavuto.
Views: 2
0 ratings
Time: 04:01 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Floor Speech on Foreign Policy Jan 26 2011]]> Thu, 27 Jan 2011 14:39:52 CST
*** Election-related or profane comments will be deleted Congressman Paul on the floor of the House
Views: 5
0 ratings
Time: 04:24 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Committee Hearing Jan 26 2011]]> Wed, 26 Jan 2011 16:09:30 CST
*** election-related or profane comments will be removed. Congressman Paul in Financial Services Committee, on the fed monetizing debt and congressional spending
Views: 3
0 ratings
Time: 06:55 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Stossel Jan 25 2011]]> Wed, 26 Jan 2011 15:48:36 CST
***Election-related or profane comments will be deleted Congressman Paul discusses the State of the Union with John Stossel
Views: 3
0 ratings
Time: 24:55 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Cavuto Jan 25 2011]]> Wed, 26 Jan 2011 11:19:47 CST
Congressman Paul talks with Neil Cavuto ahead of the state of the union address *** Election related and profane comments will be deleted
Views: 2
0 ratings
Time: 02:51 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Situation Room Jan 25 2011]]> Tue, 25 Jan 2011 17:57:45 CST
Congressman Paul talks with Wolf Blitzer ahead of the State of the Union Address
Views: 2
0 ratings
Time: 04:13 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Perpetual War is Expensive! Jan 20 2011]]> Thu, 20 Jan 2011 16:29:18 CST
Congressman Paul on our 20 year involvement in Iraq
Views: 0
0 ratings
Time: 05:14 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Floor Speech - Constitution Jan 19 2011]]> Thu, 20 Jan 2011 10:33:50 CST
Congressman Paul lauds the increased attention to the Constitution in Congress. However, lip service is not enough.
Views: 5
0 ratings
Time: 05:02 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[America Live, Fox News Jan 19 2011]]> Wed, 19 Jan 2011 15:57:23 CST
Congressman Paul discusses debt, China and healthcare with Megyn Kelly
Views: 31
4 ratings
Time: 05:32 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Tom Sullivan Show Jan 8 2011]]> Sun, 09 Jan 2011 17:44:06 CST
Congressman Paul discusses debt and the new Congress
Views: 297
53 ratings
Time: 10:08 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Dylan Ratigan Jan 6 2011]]> Thu, 06 Jan 2011 16:45:45 CST
Congressman Paul discusses the debt ceiling and spending with Dylan Ratigan
Views: 302
55 ratings
Time: 09:53 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[GMA January 5, 2011]]> Wed, 05 Jan 2011 18:17:48 CST
Congressman Paul and Senator-elect Rand Paul discuss the debt ceiling with George Stephanopoulos
Views: 151
22 ratings
Time: 05:26 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[AC360 Jan 3 2011]]> Tue, 04 Jan 2011 13:12:32 CST
Senator-elect Rand Paul and Congressman Ron Paul on Anderson Cooper
Views: 0
0 ratings
Time: 13:49 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Freedom Watch Jan 3 2011]]> Tue, 04 Jan 2011 11:01:07 CST
Congressman Paul discusses healthcare and death panels with Andrew Napolitano
Views: 6
0 ratings
Time: 04:55 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[CSPAN Newsmakers Dec 19 2010]]> Sun, 19 Dec 2010 20:06:23 CST
Congressman Paul discusses his subcommittee chairmanship on CSPAN
Views: 34
7 ratings
Time: 30:40 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Glen Beck Dec 16 2010]]> Fri, 17 Dec 2010 02:29:24 CST
Congressman Paul talks taxes on the Glen Beck show
Views: 4
1 ratings
Time: 08:56 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Congressman Paul with Charlie Gasparino December 15 2010]]> Wed, 15 Dec 2010 17:36:00 CST
Views: 74
10 ratings
Time: 06:04 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Freedom Watch Dec 14 2010]]> Tue, 14 Dec 2010 21:15:13 CST
Congressman Paul joins Judge Napolitano on Freedom Watch
Views: 11
1 ratings
Time: 05:11 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Congressman Paul on CNBC's Closing Bell with Maria Barteroma]]> Tue, 14 Dec 2010 17:37:03 CST
Congressman Paul discusses his plans as the new chairman of the Domestic Monetary Policy Subcommittee.
Views: 2
0 ratings
Time: 08:39 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Fox Business December 10 2010]]> Fri, 10 Dec 2010 11:11:55 CST
Congressman Ron Paul is interviewed by Fox Business. December 10, 2010
Views: 2
1 ratings
Time: 03:45 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Bloomberg December 10]]> Fri, 10 Dec 2010 11:04:17 CST
Congressman Ron Paul is interviewed by Bloomberg. December 10, 2010
Views: 6
1 ratings
Time: 06:41 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Bloomberg December 10 2010]]> Fri, 10 Dec 2010 11:04:17 CST
Congressman Ron Paul is interviewed by Bloomberg. December 10, 2010
Views: 302
37 ratings
Time: 06:41 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Lying is Not Patriotic]]> Thu, 09 Dec 2010 17:49:13 CST
Congressman Ron Paul speaks on the house floor. December 9, 2010
Views: 303
151 ratings
Time: 05:23 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Freedom Watch Dec 8 2010]]> Wed, 08 Dec 2010 20:41:36 CST
Freedom Watch
Views: 0
0 ratings
Time: 06:07 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Freedom Watch Dec 2 2010]]> Thu, 02 Dec 2010 21:33:45 CST
Congressman Paul discusses the Fed with Andrew Napolitano
Views: 1
0 ratings
Time: 06:08 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Fox and Friends Dec 2 2010]]> Thu, 02 Dec 2010 09:18:26 CST
Congressman Paul and Senator-elect Paul discuss fiscal matters facing the next congress with Fox and Friends
Views: 102
14 ratings
Time: 04:07 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Bloomberg Dec 1 2010]]> Wed, 01 Dec 2010 18:18:01 CST
Congressman Paul discusses the Fed and bailouts with Pimm Fox
Views: 303
100 ratings
Time: 12:16 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Congressman Paul interviewed by Neil Cavuto-11/18/2010]]> Thu, 18 Nov 2010 17:05:06 CST
Congressman Paul is interviewed by Neil Cavuto on TSA abuse, tax cuts and government bailouts. 11/18/2010
Views: 2
0 ratings
Time: 06:54 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Enough Is Enough!]]> Wed, 17 Nov 2010 20:00:24 CST
Congressman Ron Paul decries TSA abuses on the floor of the US House of Representatives 11-17-2010.
Views: 2
0 ratings
Time: 05:29 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Congressman Paul Discusses Federal Reserve Transparency on MSNBC]]> Wed, 17 Nov 2010 18:23:28 CST
Congressman Paul Discusses Federal Reserve Transparency on MSNBC on 11-17-2010.
Views: 5
0 ratings
Time: 04:42 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Dylan Ratigan Nov 10 2010]]> Wed, 10 Nov 2010 16:27:43 CST
Congressman Paul discusses the deficit
Views: 172
22 ratings
Time: 09:57 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Cavuto Nov 8 2010]]> Mon, 08 Nov 2010 18:24:43 CST
Congressman Paul discusses the Fed and fiat money with Neil Cavuto.
Views: 257
25 ratings
Time: 05:18 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Cavuto Nov 5 2010]]> Fri, 05 Nov 2010 16:32:44 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses the Fed with Neil Cavuto
Views: 3
0 ratings
Time: 05:31 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Scoreboard 11 3 2010]]> Wed, 03 Nov 2010 20:09:10 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses the Fed and the future with David Asman
Views: 0
0 ratings
Time: 14:44 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Fox Business October 20 2010]]> Thu, 21 Oct 2010 11:30:06 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses tax policy and the economy with David Asman
Views: 0
0 ratings
Time: 12:55 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Fox Bus Oct 14 2010]]> Thu, 14 Oct 2010 13:28:57 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses government spending and waste on Fox Business
Views: 64
4 ratings
Time: 03:27 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Scoreboard Oct 6 2010]]> Thu, 07 Oct 2010 13:13:54 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses the Fed and the economy with David Asman and Judge Andrew Napolitano
Views: 28
3 ratings
Time: 15:10 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Situation Room 9 8 2010]]> Wed, 08 Sep 2010 17:49:40 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses news of the day with Wolf Blitzer
Views: 171
16 ratings
Time: 06:43 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Scoreboard Sept 1, 2010]]> Thu, 02 Sep 2010 11:52:43 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses end of combat operations in Iraq.
Views: 0
0 ratings
Time: 06:43 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Willis Report 8 26 2010]]> Thu, 26 Aug 2010 17:48:56 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses the economy and housing on The Willis Report
Views: 0
0 ratings
Time: 07:26 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[AC360 Aug 23 2010]]> Tue, 24 Aug 2010 12:53:17 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses foreign policy and the controversy over the mosque near ground zero with guest host Sanjay Gupta.
Views: 185
32 ratings
Time: 07:42 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Rick's List July 29 2010]]> Thu, 29 Jul 2010 21:51:21 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses Afghanistan with Rick Sanchez on CNN
Views: 0
0 ratings
Time: 04:55 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Paul Introduces SEC Transparency Act]]> Thu, 29 Jul 2010 09:00:00 CDT Washington, D.C. - Congressman Ron Paul today introduced the SEC Transparency Act of 2010.  Recent news reports have publicized a little-noticed provision in the recently-passed financial reform package that the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has used to deny requests for information under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).


Congressman Paul's SEC Transparency Act of 2010 repeals the provision in the newly-passed legislation that the SEC has used to deny FOIA requests and ensures that the SEC will remain transparent and accountable to the American people.


“It is unfortunate, yet not unexpected, that legislation touted as fixing problems with the banking system, actually makes them worse and provides more cover and power for organizations that failed us like the SEC and the Fed.  I expect in the coming weeks and months that many more harmful provisions like this will come to light and it will take quite a bit of work to undo the damage from this massive and misguided legislation,” stated Congressman Paul.


###

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<![CDATA[Paul Introduces SEC Transparency Act]]> Thu, 29 Jul 2010 09:00:00 CDT Washington, D.C. - Congressman Ron Paul today introduced the SEC Transparency Act of 2010.  Recent news reports have publicized a little-noticed provision in the recently-passed financial reform package that the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has used to deny requests for information under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).


Congressman Paul's SEC Transparency Act of 2010 repeals the provision in the newly-passed legislation that the SEC has used to deny FOIA requests and ensures that the SEC will remain transparent and accountable to the American people.


“It is unfortunate, yet not unexpected, that legislation touted as fixing problems with the banking system, actually makes them worse and provides more cover and power for organizations that failed us like the SEC and the Fed.  I expect in the coming weeks and months that many more harmful provisions like this will come to light and it will take quite a bit of work to undo the damage from this massive and misguided legislation,” stated Congressman Paul.


###




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<![CDATA[Floor Debate on Pakistan War Powers Resolution]]> Wed, 28 Jul 2010 15:24:30 CDT
July 27 2010 Congressman Paul's portions of the floor debate on the Paul / Kucinich privileged resolution
Views: 1
0 ratings
Time: 14:31 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Fair Sentending Act Jul 28 2010]]> Wed, 28 Jul 2010 14:31:50 CDT
Floor speech in support of the Fair Sentencing Act
Views: 1
1 ratings
Time: 02:15 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Fair Sentencing Act Jul 28 2010]]> Wed, 28 Jul 2010 14:31:50 CDT
Floor speech in support of the Fair Sentencing Act
Views: 136
25 ratings
Time: 02:15 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Statement on the Fair Sentencing Act]]> Wed, 28 Jul 2010 09:00:00 CDT Madam Speaker, I rise in reluctant support for S. 1789, the Fair Sentencing Act.  My support is reluctant because S. 1789 is an uncomfortable mix of some provisions that reduce the harms of the federal war on drugs and other provisions that increase the harms of that disastrous and unconstitutional war.  I am supporting this legislation because I am optimistic the legislation’s overall effect will be positive.

Congress should be looking critically at how we can extricate America from the four decades of destruction that has ensued since President Richard Nixon announced the federal war on drugs in 1972.  As a medical doctor with over 30 years’ experience, I certainly recognize the dangers that can arise from drug abuse.  However, experience shows that the federal drug war creates many additional dangers, while failing to reduce the problems associated with drug abuse.  Like 14 years of federal alcohol prohibition in the 1920s and ’30s, America’s federal drug war has failed to ameliorate the problems associate with drug use, while fostering violence and disrespect for individual rights.

While imperfect, I am optimistic that the Senate bill being considered today will reduce the harms of the federal drug war.  I also hope consideration of this legislation will enliven interest in ending the federal war on drugs.

It is unfortunate that the House of Representatives is today considering this compromise legislation from the Senate instead of Rep. Bobby Scott’s HR 3245, the Fairness in Cocaine Sentencing Act.  I am an original cosponsor of Rep. Scott’s bill, which passed the House of Representatives Committee on the Judiciary on July 29, 2009—one year ago tomorrow.  Rep. Scott’s legislation is a short and simple bill that repeals a handful of clauses, sentences, and subparagraphs of federal drug laws to eliminate the 100 to one drug weight basis for sentencing disparity for crack cocaine violations in comparison to powder cocaine violations.

I will vote for the Senate legislation today because it rolls back some of the enhanced mandatory minimum sentences for crack cocaine that the federal government created in 1986.  These enhanced mandatory minimum sentences have caused people convicted for small amounts of crack cocaine to serve much longer sentences in prison than people convicted for the same amount of powder cocaine.

While the Senate legislation reduces the drug weight basis for mandatory minimum sentencing disparity between crack cocaine and powder cocaine convictions for many individuals to only 18 to one compared to the total elimination of the disparity in Rep. Scott’s bill, the Senate bill does make a step in the right direction.  The Senate bill eliminates entirely the mandatory minimum sentence for simple possession of crack cocaine and reduces significantly the mandatory minimum sentence for many people convicted of crack offenses by raising the number of grams of crack cocaine a person must possess for each mandatory minimum sentence level to apply.  In addition, the Senate bill allows courts to show compassion for individuals with compelling cases for leniency by reducing sentences for some people convicted of controlled substances violations who a court determines meet requirements including having minimum knowledge of the illegal enterprise, receiving no monetary compensation from the illegal transaction, and being motivated by threats, fear, or an intimate or family relationship.

Unfortunately, while the Senate bill reduces some of the most extreme and unjust mandatory minimum sentences in the federal drug war, it also contains expansions of the federal drug war that I fear may yield results destructive to individual liberty and public safety.  In particular, the Senate bill significantly increases maximum allowed monetary penalties for violations of federal restrictions on controlled substances and increases sentences for people convicted of controlled substances violations whose circumstances include certain aggravating factors.

Some people will argue that the increased penalties in the Senate legislation are desirable because they target people who are high up in the illegal drug trade or who took particularly disturbing actions, such as involving a minor in drug trafficking.  But, the history of the federal drug war has shown that ramping up penalties always results in increasing rather than decreasing the harms arising from the federal drug war.  Such enhanced penalties increase the risks of the drug trade thus causing illegal drug operations to be more ruthless and violent in their tactics.  Enhanced penalties also can result in even more inflated prices for illegal drugs, leading to more thefts by individuals seeking funds to support their drug use.  High monetary fines for drug trafficking also tend to provide police and prosecutors with a perverse incentive to focus on nonviolent drug crimes instead of violent crimes.

Each successive ramping up of the federal war on drugs has made it more evident that this war is incompatible with constitutional government, individual liberty, and prosperity.  It is time for Congress to reverse course.  I am optimistic that S. 1789—even with its faults—may signal that Congress is ready to begin reversing course.  It is imperative that the House of Representatives pursue a dialogue on how we can end the federal war on drugs—a war that has increasingly become a war on the American people and our Constitution.

]]>
<![CDATA[Statement on the Fair Sentencing Act]]> Wed, 28 Jul 2010 09:00:00 CDT Madam Speaker, I rise in reluctant support for S. 1789, the Fair Sentencing Act.  My support is reluctant because S. 1789 is an uncomfortable mix of some provisions that reduce the harms of the federal war on drugs and other provisions that increase the harms of that disastrous and unconstitutional war.  I am supporting this legislation because I am optimistic the legislation’s overall effect will be positive.

Congress should be looking critically at how we can extricate America from the four decades of destruction that has ensued since President Richard Nixon announced the federal war on drugs in 1972.  As a medical doctor with over 30 years’ experience, I certainly recognize the dangers that can arise from drug abuse.  However, experience shows that the federal drug war creates many additional dangers, while failing to reduce the problems associated with drug abuse.  Like 14 years of federal alcohol prohibition in the 1920s and ’30s, America’s federal drug war has failed to ameliorate the problems associate with drug use, while fostering violence and disrespect for individual rights.

While imperfect, I am optimistic that the Senate bill being considered today will reduce the harms of the federal drug war.  I also hope consideration of this legislation will enliven interest in ending the federal war on drugs.

It is unfortunate that the House of Representatives is today considering this compromise legislation from the Senate instead of Rep. Bobby Scott’s HR 3245, the Fairness in Cocaine Sentencing Act.  I am an original cosponsor of Rep. Scott’s bill, which passed the House of Representatives Committee on the Judiciary on July 29, 2009—one year ago tomorrow.  Rep. Scott’s legislation is a short and simple bill that repeals a handful of clauses, sentences, and subparagraphs of federal drug laws to eliminate the 100 to one drug weight basis for sentencing disparity for crack cocaine violations in comparison to powder cocaine violations.

I will vote for the Senate legislation today because it rolls back some of the enhanced mandatory minimum sentences for crack cocaine that the federal government created in 1986.  These enhanced mandatory minimum sentences have caused people convicted for small amounts of crack cocaine to serve much longer sentences in prison than people convicted for the same amount of powder cocaine.

While the Senate legislation reduces the drug weight basis for mandatory minimum sentencing disparity between crack cocaine and powder cocaine convictions for many individuals to only 18 to one compared to the total elimination of the disparity in Rep. Scott’s bill, the Senate bill does make a step in the right direction.  The Senate bill eliminates entirely the mandatory minimum sentence for simple possession of crack cocaine and reduces significantly the mandatory minimum sentence for many people convicted of crack offenses by raising the number of grams of crack cocaine a person must possess for each mandatory minimum sentence level to apply.  In addition, the Senate bill allows courts to show compassion for individuals with compelling cases for leniency by reducing sentences for some people convicted of controlled substances violations who a court determines meet requirements including having minimum knowledge of the illegal enterprise, receiving no monetary compensation from the illegal transaction, and being motivated by threats, fear, or an intimate or family relationship.

Unfortunately, while the Senate bill reduces some of the most extreme and unjust mandatory minimum sentences in the federal drug war, it also contains expansions of the federal drug war that I fear may yield results destructive to individual liberty and public safety.  In particular, the Senate bill significantly increases maximum allowed monetary penalties for violations of federal restrictions on controlled substances and increases sentences for people convicted of controlled substances violations whose circumstances include certain aggravating factors.

Some people will argue that the increased penalties in the Senate legislation are desirable because they target people who are high up in the illegal drug trade or who took particularly disturbing actions, such as involving a minor in drug trafficking.  But, the history of the federal drug war has shown that ramping up penalties always results in increasing rather than decreasing the harms arising from the federal drug war.  Such enhanced penalties increase the risks of the drug trade thus causing illegal drug operations to be more ruthless and violent in their tactics.  Enhanced penalties also can result in even more inflated prices for illegal drugs, leading to more thefts by individuals seeking funds to support their drug use.  High monetary fines for drug trafficking also tend to provide police and prosecutors with a perverse incentive to focus on nonviolent drug crimes instead of violent crimes.

Each successive ramping up of the federal war on drugs has made it more evident that this war is incompatible with constitutional government, individual liberty, and prosperity.  It is time for Congress to reverse course.  I am optimistic that S. 1789—even with its faults—may signal that Congress is ready to begin reversing course.  It is imperative that the House of Representatives pursue a dialogue on how we can end the federal war on drugs—a war that has increasingly become a war on the American people and our Constitution.

]]>
<![CDATA[Financial Services Hearing July 22 2010 Part 2]]> Thu, 22 Jul 2010 16:59:16 CDT
Congressman Paul questions Dr. Allan Meltzer
Views: 9
0 ratings
Time: 05:33 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Financial Services Hearing July 22 2010]]> Thu, 22 Jul 2010 11:22:34 CDT
Congressman Paul gives and opening statement and questions Ben Bernanke
Views: 0
0 ratings
Time: 08:30 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Financial Services Hearing on Coinage July 20 2010]]> Tue, 20 Jul 2010 17:56:35 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses coinage at a hearing entitled "The State of US Coins and Currency"
Views: 6893
198 ratings
Time: 11:00 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[HR 2267: the Internet Gambling Regulation, Consumer Protection, and Enforcement Act]]> Tue, 20 Jul 2010 09:00:00 CDT
Thank you Mr. Chairman for holding this hearing on  HR 2267, the Internet Gambling Regulation, Consumer Protection, and Enforcement Act. While it is out of character for me, to say the least, to support a bill that regulates private transactions, I support HR 2267 because it repeals the ban on Internet gambling. The bill does not create any new federal laws; it merely establishes a process to ensure that gambling sites can comply with existing laws, and thus offer their services to adults who wish to gamble online.

The ban on Internet gambling infringes upon two freedoms that are important to many Americans: the ability to do with their money as they see fit, and the freedom from government interference with the Internet.

The proper role of the federal government is not that of a nanny, protecting citizens from any and every potential negative consequence of their actions.  Although I personally believe gambling to be a dumb waste of money, American citizens should be just as free to spend their money playing online poker as they should be able to buy a used car, enter into a mortgage, or invest in a hedge fund.  Risk is inherent in any economic activity, and it is not for the government to determine which risky behaviors Americans may or may not engage in.

The Internet is a powerful tool, and any censorship of Internet activity sets a dangerous precedent.  Many Americans rely on the Internet for activities as varied as watching basketball games, keeping up on international news broadcasts, or buying food and clothing.  In the last few years we have seen ominous signs of the federal government's desire to control the Internet.  The ostensible reasons are to protect Americans from sex offenders, terrorists, and the evils of gambling, but once the door is open to government intrusion, there is no telling what legitimate activity, especially political activity, might fall afoul of government authorities.

The ban on Internet gambling also forces financial institutions to act as law enforcement officers.  This is another pernicious trend that has accelerated in the aftermath of the Patriot Act, the deputization of private businesses to perform intrusive enforcement and surveillance functions that the federal government is unwilling to perform on its own.

Mr. Chairman, while I am willing to support HR 2267 as a means to repeal the total ban on internet gambling, I urge my colleagues to oppose any attempt to tax internet gambling. Taxing any commercial transition, including gambling, is an unwarranted expansion of the taxing power and will cripple the development of internet commerce. Furthermore, since the power to tax is the power to destroy, imposing taxes on internet gambling could simply morph into a backdoor way of banning gambling on the internet. If opponents of the internet gambling ban are serious about expanding individual liberty, they will oppose restricting the freedom of internet users to do what they want with their time and property by imposing taxes on the bill.

In conclusion, I urge my colleagues to support Chairman Frank's HR 2267. While not perfect these bills will take a step toward liberty by restoring the right of Americans to decide for them whether or not to gamble online.




]]>
<![CDATA[The State of US Coins and Currency]]> Tue, 20 Jul 2010 09:00:00 CDT I oppose the Mint's current efforts to gain greater power in determining the composition of circulating coinage.  It is unconstitutional to delegate the determination of the metal content of our coinage to the Secretary of the Treasury.  Under Article I Section 8 of the Constitution, the Congress is given the power to coin money and regulate the value thereof.  It is a shame that Congress has already unconstitutionally delegated its coinage authority to the Treasury Department, but that is no reason to further delegate our power and essentially abdicate Congressional oversight.

Oversight by members of Congress, who have an incentive to listen to their constituents, ensures openness and transparency.  Legislation to delegate added authority to the Mint would eliminate that process and delegate it to unelected bureaucrats.  The Secretary of the Treasury would be given sole discretion to alter the metal content of coins, or even to create non-metal coins.  Given the history of Congressional delegation and subsequent lax oversight on issues as important as the conflict in Iraq, it would be naïve to believe that Congress would exercise any more oversight over an issue as unimportant to most members as the composition of coins.

While I sympathize with the aim of saving taxpayer dollars by reducing the cost of coinage, it is disappointing that our currency has been so greatly devalued as to make this step necessary.  At the time of the penny's introduction, it actually had some purchasing power.  Based on the price of gold, what one penny would have purchased in 1910 requires 57 cents today.  It is no wonder then that few people nowadays would stoop to pick up any coin smaller than a quarter. 

Congress' unconstitutional delegation of monetary policy to the Federal Reserve and its reluctance to exercise oversight in that arena have led to a massive devaluation of the dollar.  If we fail to end this devaluation, we will undoubtedly hold future hearings as the metal value of our coins continues to outstrip the face value. 

One of the witnesses on our second panel mentions the importance of the Mint's production of bullion coinage, and the danger of counterfeited collector coins that may or may not be minted from silver or gold.  It is a shame that instead of protecting the value of the dollar to ensure that precious metal coins could still circulate as money, or enforcing counterfeiting laws to stop the flow of clearly fraudulent coins, the federal government insists on printing trillions of dollars out of thin air, and prosecuting individuals who attempt to create precious metal currencies to compete with the devalued US dollar.

The topics discussed in today's hearing exemplify how far we have fallen, not just since the days of the Founders, but only in the last 75 to 100 years.  We could not maintain the gold standard nor the silver standard.  We could not maintain the copper standard, and now we cannot even maintain the zinc standard.  Paper money inevitably breeds inflation and destroys the value of the currency. 

]]>
<![CDATA[HR 2267: the Internet Gambling Regulation, Consumer Protection, and Enforcement Act]]> Tue, 20 Jul 2010 09:00:00 CDT
Thank you Mr. Chairman for holding this hearing on  HR 2267, the Internet Gambling Regulation, Consumer Protection, and Enforcement Act. While it is out of character for me, to say the least, to support a bill that regulates private transactions, I support HR 2267 because it repeals the ban on Internet gambling. The bill does not create any new federal laws; it merely establishes a process to ensure that gambling sites can comply with existing laws, and thus offer their services to adults who wish to gamble online.

The ban on Internet gambling infringes upon two freedoms that are important to many Americans: the ability to do with their money as they see fit, and the freedom from government interference with the Internet.

The proper role of the federal government is not that of a nanny, protecting citizens from any and every potential negative consequence of their actions.  Although I personally believe gambling to be a dumb waste of money, American citizens should be just as free to spend their money playing online poker as they should be able to buy a used car, enter into a mortgage, or invest in a hedge fund.  Risk is inherent in any economic activity, and it is not for the government to determine which risky behaviors Americans may or may not engage in.

The Internet is a powerful tool, and any censorship of Internet activity sets a dangerous precedent.  Many Americans rely on the Internet for activities as varied as watching basketball games, keeping up on international news broadcasts, or buying food and clothing.  In the last few years we have seen ominous signs of the federal government's desire to control the Internet.  The ostensible reasons are to protect Americans from sex offenders, terrorists, and the evils of gambling, but once the door is open to government intrusion, there is no telling what legitimate activity, especially political activity, might fall afoul of government authorities.

The ban on Internet gambling also forces financial institutions to act as law enforcement officers.  This is another pernicious trend that has accelerated in the aftermath of the Patriot Act, the deputization of private businesses to perform intrusive enforcement and surveillance functions that the federal government is unwilling to perform on its own.

Mr. Chairman, while I am willing to support HR 2267 as a means to repeal the total ban on internet gambling, I urge my colleagues to oppose any attempt to tax internet gambling. Taxing any commercial transition, including gambling, is an unwarranted expansion of the taxing power and will cripple the development of internet commerce. Furthermore, since the power to tax is the power to destroy, imposing taxes on internet gambling could simply morph into a backdoor way of banning gambling on the internet. If opponents of the internet gambling ban are serious about expanding individual liberty, they will oppose restricting the freedom of internet users to do what they want with their time and property by imposing taxes on the bill.

In conclusion, I urge my colleagues to support Chairman Frank's HR 2267. While not perfect these bills will take a step toward liberty by restoring the right of Americans to decide for them whether or not to gamble online.

]]>
<![CDATA[The State of US Coins and Currency]]> Tue, 20 Jul 2010 09:00:00 CDT I oppose the Mint's current efforts to gain greater power in determining the composition of circulating coinage.  It is unconstitutional to delegate the determination of the metal content of our coinage to the Secretary of the Treasury.  Under Article I Section 8 of the Constitution, the Congress is given the power to coin money and regulate the value thereof.  It is a shame that Congress has already unconstitutionally delegated its coinage authority to the Treasury Department, but that is no reason to further delegate our power and essentially abdicate Congressional oversight.

Oversight by members of Congress, who have an incentive to listen to their constituents, ensures openness and transparency.  Legislation to delegate added authority to the Mint would eliminate that process and delegate it to unelected bureaucrats.  The Secretary of the Treasury would be given sole discretion to alter the metal content of coins, or even to create non-metal coins.  Given the history of Congressional delegation and subsequent lax oversight on issues as important as the conflict in Iraq, it would be naïve to believe that Congress would exercise any more oversight over an issue as unimportant to most members as the composition of coins.

While I sympathize with the aim of saving taxpayer dollars by reducing the cost of coinage, it is disappointing that our currency has been so greatly devalued as to make this step necessary.  At the time of the penny's introduction, it actually had some purchasing power.  Based on the price of gold, what one penny would have purchased in 1910 requires 57 cents today.  It is no wonder then that few people nowadays would stoop to pick up any coin smaller than a quarter. 

Congress' unconstitutional delegation of monetary policy to the Federal Reserve and its reluctance to exercise oversight in that arena have led to a massive devaluation of the dollar.  If we fail to end this devaluation, we will undoubtedly hold future hearings as the metal value of our coins continues to outstrip the face value. 

One of the witnesses on our second panel mentions the importance of the Mint's production of bullion coinage, and the danger of counterfeited collector coins that may or may not be minted from silver or gold.  It is a shame that instead of protecting the value of the dollar to ensure that precious metal coins could still circulate as money, or enforcing counterfeiting laws to stop the flow of clearly fraudulent coins, the federal government insists on printing trillions of dollars out of thin air, and prosecuting individuals who attempt to create precious metal currencies to compete with the devalued US dollar.

The topics discussed in today's hearing exemplify how far we have fallen, not just since the days of the Founders, but only in the last 75 to 100 years.  We could not maintain the gold standard nor the silver standard.  We could not maintain the copper standard, and now we cannot even maintain the zinc standard.  Paper money inevitably breeds inflation and destroys the value of the currency. 




]]>
<![CDATA[Statement at JEC Hearing July 14, 2010]]> Wed, 14 Jul 2010 14:52:58 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses the business cycle and government contributions to our economic turmoil.
Views: 13507
261 ratings
Time: 03:02 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Scoreboard July 9, 2010 Part 2]]> Fri, 09 Jul 2010 19:49:09 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses a poll with David Asman on Fox Business.
Views: 959
56 ratings
Time: 09:55 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Scoreboard July 9, 2010]]> Fri, 09 Jul 2010 19:38:12 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses a poll with David Asman on Fox Business.
Views: 5347
58 ratings
Time: 06:04 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[End this War Part 2]]> Thu, 08 Jul 2010 11:34:33 CDT
Congressman Paul gives a 5 minute speech on the House Floor on Afghanistan
Views: 0
0 ratings
Time: 05:17 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[End this War - Part 1]]> Wed, 07 Jul 2010 14:38:55 CDT
From Thursday, July 1 - a two minute floor speech on continuing the Afghanistan conflict. Part 2 is a five minute speech from later that evening expanding on this topic.
Views: 0
0 ratings
Time: 02:19 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Freshman Award for Ron Paul]]> Thu, 01 Jul 2010 13:57:44 CDT
Freshman Republicans Recognize Rep. Paul for his legislation to bring greater transparency to government institutions.
Views: 0
0 ratings
Time: 01:31 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[The War That's Not a War]]> Thu, 01 Jul 2010 09:00:00 CDT In January 1991, we went to war in the Middle East against Saddam Hussein, Iraq’s dictator who was our ally during the Iran-Iraq war. A border dispute between Kuwait and Iraq broke out after our State Department gave a green light for Hussein’s invasion.

After Iraq’s successful invasion of Kuwait we reacted with gusto and have been militarily involved in the entire region, six thousand miles from our shores, ever since. This has included Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, and Somalia. After twenty years of killing and a couple trillion dollars wasted, not only does the fighting continue with no end in sight, but our leaders threaten to spread our bombs of benevolence on Iran.

For most Americans, we are at war -- at war against a tactic called terrorism, not a country.

This allows our military to go any place in the world without limits as to time or place.

But how can we be at war? Congress has not declared war as required by the Constitution.

That is true, but our presidents have and Congress and the people have not objected. Congress obediently provides all the money requested for the “war.”

People are dying, bombs are dropped, our soldiers are shot at and killed.

Our soldiers wear uniforms; our enemies do not.  They are not part of any government. They have no planes, no tanks, no ships, no missiles, and no modern technology.

What kind of a war is this anyway? If it really is one. If it was a real war we would have won it by now.

Our stated goal since 9/11 has been to destroy al Qaeda. Was al Qaeda in Iraq? Not under Saddam Hussein. Our leaders lied us into invading Iraq and deceived us into occupying Afghanistan.

There’s still really no al Qaeda in Iraq and only a hundred or so in Afghanistan, yet there is no end in sight to the “war.” Could there have been other reasons for this war that is not a war?

Military victory in Afghanistan is illusive. Does anyone really know whom we are fighting and why?

Why has the war not ended? Nine years and it continues to spread. Some claim it is to keep America safe, that our soldiers are fighting and dying for our freedom, defending our Constitution. Are we being lied to in order to keep us in this spreading war, just as we were lied to in the 1960’s to keep us in Vietnam?

We own the Iraq government as we do Afghanistan’s. In Afghanistan we are fighting the Taliban-those dangerous people with guns, defending their homeland.

Once they were called the Mujahideen, our old allies, along with Osama bin Laden, in the fight to oust the Soviets from Afghanistan in the 1980’s.

In that effort our CIA funded radical jihad against those nasty foreign occupiers-the Russians.

What gratitude? Those same people now resent our benevolent occupation-with a little violence thrown in.

The resistance to our presence grows as our perseverance wanes.

Our people are waking up but our officials refuse to recognize the longer we stay the greater is the support for those dedicated to the principle that Afghanistan is for Afghans, who resent all foreign occupation.

The harder we fight a war that is not a war, the weaker we get and the stronger becomes our enemy.

When an enemy without weapons can resist an army of great strength, the most powerful of all history, one should ask, who has the moral high ground?

Military failure in Afghanistan is to be our destiny. Changing generals without changing our policies or our policy makers perpetuates our agony and delays the inevitable.

This is not a war that our generals have been trained for. Nation building, police work, social engineering is never a job for foreign occupiers and never an appropriate job for soldiers trained to win wars.

A military victory is no longer even a stated goal of our military leaders or our politicians, as they know that type of victory is impossible.

The sad story is:

This war is against ourselves, our values, our Constitution, our financial well being and common sense, and at the rate we are going, it is going to end badly. What we need are honest leaders with character and a new foreign policy.

]]>
<![CDATA[The War That's Not a War]]> Thu, 01 Jul 2010 09:00:00 CDT In January 1991, we went to war in the Middle East against Saddam Hussein, Iraq’s dictator who was our ally during the Iran-Iraq war. A border dispute between Kuwait and Iraq broke out after our State Department gave a green light for Hussein’s invasion.

After Iraq’s successful invasion of Kuwait we reacted with gusto and have been militarily involved in the entire region, six thousand miles from our shores, ever since. This has included Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, and Somalia. After twenty years of killing and a couple trillion dollars wasted, not only does the fighting continue with no end in sight, but our leaders threaten to spread our bombs of benevolence on Iran.

For most Americans, we are at war -- at war against a tactic called terrorism, not a country.

This allows our military to go any place in the world without limits as to time or place.

But how can we be at war? Congress has not declared war as required by the Constitution.

That is true, but our presidents have and Congress and the people have not objected. Congress obediently provides all the money requested for the “war.”

People are dying, bombs are dropped, our soldiers are shot at and killed.

Our soldiers wear uniforms; our enemies do not.  They are not part of any government. They have no planes, no tanks, no ships, no missiles, and no modern technology.

What kind of a war is this anyway? If it really is one. If it was a real war we would have won it by now.

Our stated goal since 9/11 has been to destroy al Qaeda. Was al Qaeda in Iraq? Not under Saddam Hussein. Our leaders lied us into invading Iraq and deceived us into occupying Afghanistan.

There’s still really no al Qaeda in Iraq and only a hundred or so in Afghanistan, yet there is no end in sight to the “war.” Could there have been other reasons for this war that is not a war?

Military victory in Afghanistan is illusive. Does anyone really know whom we are fighting and why?

Why has the war not ended? Nine years and it continues to spread. Some claim it is to keep America safe, that our soldiers are fighting and dying for our freedom, defending our Constitution. Are we being lied to in order to keep us in this spreading war, just as we were lied to in the 1960’s to keep us in Vietnam?

We own the Iraq government as we do Afghanistan’s. In Afghanistan we are fighting the Taliban-those dangerous people with guns, defending their homeland.

Once they were called the Mujahideen, our old allies, along with Osama bin Laden, in the fight to oust the Soviets from Afghanistan in the 1980’s.

In that effort our CIA funded radical jihad against those nasty foreign occupiers-the Russians.

What gratitude? Those same people now resent our benevolent occupation-with a little violence thrown in.

The resistance to our presence grows as our perseverance wanes.

Our people are waking up but our officials refuse to recognize the longer we stay the greater is the support for those dedicated to the principle that Afghanistan is for Afghans, who resent all foreign occupation.

The harder we fight a war that is not a war, the weaker we get and the stronger becomes our enemy.

When an enemy without weapons can resist an army of great strength, the most powerful of all history, one should ask, who has the moral high ground?

Military failure in Afghanistan is to be our destiny. Changing generals without changing our policies or our policy makers perpetuates our agony and delays the inevitable.

This is not a war that our generals have been trained for. Nation building, police work, social engineering is never a job for foreign occupiers and never an appropriate job for soldiers trained to win wars.

A military victory is no longer even a stated goal of our military leaders or our politicians, as they know that type of victory is impossible.

The sad story is:

This war is against ourselves, our values, our Constitution, our financial well being and common sense, and at the rate we are going, it is going to end badly. What we need are honest leaders with character and a new foreign policy.

]]>
<![CDATA[House GOP Champions Paul's "Audit the Fed"]]> Wed, 30 Jun 2010 09:00:00 CDT Washington, D.C. - Congressman Paul was pleased today when House Republicans submitted a Motion to Recommit the financial regulatory reform bill as a last effort to include his provision to fully audit the Federal Reserve in the final version.

The conference committee failed to include this provision, supported by 320 Members of the House, in the final version of the massive reform bill, which grants sweeping new regulatory powers to the Federal Reserve, while doing nothing to address the root causes of current economic problems.

“It is foolish to grant more powers to the institutions that caused all the moral hazard and malinvestments that got us into this mess.  It is doubly foolish to do so without any meaningful accountability or transparency,” stated Congressman Paul.

Unfortunately, the Motion to Recommit was defeated 198 to 229 and the final bill passed the House shortly afterwards.




]]>
<![CDATA[House GOP Champions Paul's "Audit the Fed"]]> Wed, 30 Jun 2010 09:00:00 CDT Washington, D.C. - Congressman Paul was pleased today when House Republicans submitted a Motion to Recommit the financial regulatory reform bill as a last effort to include his provision to fully audit the Federal Reserve in the final version.

The conference committee failed to include this provision, supported by 320 Members of the House, in the final version of the massive reform bill, which grants sweeping new regulatory powers to the Federal Reserve, while doing nothing to address the root causes of current economic problems.

“It is foolish to grant more powers to the institutions that caused all the moral hazard and malinvestments that got us into this mess.  It is doubly foolish to do so without any meaningful accountability or transparency,” stated Congressman Paul.

Unfortunately, the Motion to Recommit was defeated 198 to 229 and the final bill passed the House shortly afterwards.

]]>
<![CDATA[Neil Cavuto June 24, 2010]]> Thu, 24 Jun 2010 16:31:48 CDT
Congressman Paul talks with Stuart Varney on Neil Cavuto's show...
Views: 0
0 ratings
Time: 04:09 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Statement Opposing HR 5481]]> Thu, 24 Jun 2010 09:00:00 CDT Madam Speaker, I oppose HR 5481, which gives subpoena power to the National Commission on the British Petroleum Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling. This is an overly broad grant of power to a presidential commission. This commission was created by Executive Order without any input from Congress and appears designed to perform oversight and policy functions that should be performed by Congress.  Furthermore, this commission may be used to promote the anti-freedom and economically destructive “cap-and-trade” legislation, as well as provide justification for the administration’s policies of restricting offshore drilling.

 Instead of  ratifying the Executive Branch’s continued use of the deepwater disaster as an excuse to usurp more power, Congress should ensure that the Executive Brach actions do not allow  British Petroleum to escape accountability for the damages caused by the spill  and that any necessary  policy changes  are made by Congress.




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<![CDATA[Statement on H. Res. 1422]]> Thu, 24 Jun 2010 09:00:00 CDT Madam Speaker, the House of Representatives recently considered H.RES. 1422, honoring the 140th anniversary of the Department of Justice. I voted against this resolution because of the Justice Department’s history of violating individual rights.


It is the Justice Department that leads the ongoing violations of the Fourth, Fifth, Ninth, and Tenth Amendments in the name of the “war on drugs.”  It is Justice Department agents who perform warrantless wiretap, and “sneak-and-peak” searches under the misnamed PATRIOT Act. It is the Justice Department that prosecutes American citizens for violating unconstitutional federal regulations even in cases where no reasonable person could have known their actions violated federal law.


Some like to pretend that the Justice Department’s assault on liberties is a modern phenomenon, or that abuses of liberties are only carried out by one political party. However, history shows that the unconstitutional usurpations of power and abuse of rights goes back at least almost a hundred years to the “Progressive” era and that Justice Departments of both parties have disregard the Constitution and violated individual liberties.


During World War I, President Woodrow Wilson’s Justice Department imprisoned people who dared to speak out against the war. Following the war, the progressive assault on the First Amendment continued with the infamous “Palmer raids,” named for Wilson’s Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer.  Just as President Wilson’s policies of foreign interventionism and domestic welfare served as a model for future presidents, Attorney General Palmer’s assaults on civil liberties served as a model for future attorney generals of both parties.  Think of Robert Kennedy authorizing the wiretapping of Martin Luther King, Jr, John Mitchell’s role in the abuses of civil liberties by Nixon Administration, Ed Meese’s assault on the First Amendment with his “pornography commission,” Janet Reno’s role in the murder of innocent men, women and children at Waco, and the steady erosion of our rights over the past decade.  In addition, it is the attorney general and the Justice Department that defend and justify violations of constitutional liberties by the president and the other federal bureaucracies.


Many civil libertarians were hopeful the new administration would be more sympathetic to civil liberties than was the prior administration. But the current administration has disregarded campaign promises to restore respect for civil liberates and has continued, and in many cases expanded, the anti-freedom policies of its predecessors.  For instance, the current administration is supporting renewal of the policies of warrantless wiretapping, and other PATRIOT Act provisions. The administration, despite promising to be more open and transparent, is also continuing to use the claim of "state secrets" to shield potentially embarrassing information from Americans.  According to the New York Times, the current administration is even outdoing its predecessors in the prosecution of government whistleblowers.  It is little wonder that the head of the American Civil Liberties Union recently said he is disgusted with the administration’s record on civil liberties.


Of course, Madam Speaker, Congress bears ultimate responsibility for the Justice Department’s actions, as it is Congress that passes the unconstitutional laws the Justice Department enforces. Congress also fails to perform effective oversight of the Justice Department. Instead of honoring the Justice Department, Congress should begin to repeal unconstitutional laws and start exercising congressional oversight of executive branch agencies that menace our freedoms.

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<![CDATA[Statement on H. Res. 1422]]> Thu, 24 Jun 2010 09:00:00 CDT Madam Speaker, the House of Representatives recently considered H.RES. 1422, honoring the 140th anniversary of the Department of Justice. I voted against this resolution because of the Justice Department’s history of violating individual rights.


It is the Justice Department that leads the ongoing violations of the Fourth, Fifth, Ninth, and Tenth Amendments in the name of the “war on drugs.”  It is Justice Department agents who perform warrantless wiretap, and “sneak-and-peak” searches under the misnamed PATRIOT Act. It is the Justice Department that prosecutes American citizens for violating unconstitutional federal regulations even in cases where no reasonable person could have known their actions violated federal law.


Some like to pretend that the Justice Department’s assault on liberties is a modern phenomenon, or that abuses of liberties are only carried out by one political party. However, history shows that the unconstitutional usurpations of power and abuse of rights goes back at least almost a hundred years to the “Progressive” era and that Justice Departments of both parties have disregard the Constitution and violated individual liberties.


During World War I, President Woodrow Wilson’s Justice Department imprisoned people who dared to speak out against the war. Following the war, the progressive assault on the First Amendment continued with the infamous “Palmer raids,” named for Wilson’s Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer.  Just as President Wilson’s policies of foreign interventionism and domestic welfare served as a model for future presidents, Attorney General Palmer’s assaults on civil liberties served as a model for future attorney generals of both parties.  Think of Robert Kennedy authorizing the wiretapping of Martin Luther King, Jr, John Mitchell’s role in the abuses of civil liberties by Nixon Administration, Ed Meese’s assault on the First Amendment with his “pornography commission,” Janet Reno’s role in the murder of innocent men, women and children at Waco, and the steady erosion of our rights over the past decade.  In addition, it is the attorney general and the Justice Department that defend and justify violations of constitutional liberties by the president and the other federal bureaucracies.


Many civil libertarians were hopeful the new administration would be more sympathetic to civil liberties than was the prior administration. But the current administration has disregarded campaign promises to restore respect for civil liberates and has continued, and in many cases expanded, the anti-freedom policies of its predecessors.  For instance, the current administration is supporting renewal of the policies of warrantless wiretapping, and other PATRIOT Act provisions. The administration, despite promising to be more open and transparent, is also continuing to use the claim of "state secrets" to shield potentially embarrassing information from Americans.  According to the New York Times, the current administration is even outdoing its predecessors in the prosecution of government whistleblowers.  It is little wonder that the head of the American Civil Liberties Union recently said he is disgusted with the administration’s record on civil liberties.


Of course, Madam Speaker, Congress bears ultimate responsibility for the Justice Department’s actions, as it is Congress that passes the unconstitutional laws the Justice Department enforces. Congress also fails to perform effective oversight of the Justice Department. Instead of honoring the Justice Department, Congress should begin to repeal unconstitutional laws and start exercising congressional oversight of executive branch agencies that menace our freedoms.

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<![CDATA[Statement Opposing HR 5481]]> Thu, 24 Jun 2010 09:00:00 CDT Madam Speaker, I oppose HR 5481, which gives subpoena power to the National Commission on the British Petroleum Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling. This is an overly broad grant of power to a presidential commission. This commission was created by Executive Order without any input from Congress and appears designed to perform oversight and policy functions that should be performed by Congress.  Furthermore, this commission may be used to promote the anti-freedom and economically destructive “cap-and-trade” legislation, as well as provide justification for the administration’s policies of restricting offshore drilling.

 Instead of  ratifying the Executive Branch’s continued use of the deepwater disaster as an excuse to usurp more power, Congress should ensure that the Executive Brach actions do not allow  British Petroleum to escape accountability for the damages caused by the spill  and that any necessary  policy changes  are made by Congress.




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<![CDATA[Nightly Scoreboard June 22, 2010]]> Tue, 22 Jun 2010 19:36:59 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses the BP oil spill with David Asman
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<![CDATA[Situation Room June 22, 2010]]> Tue, 22 Jun 2010 18:31:05 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses the BP oil spill, Gen McChrystal and Rand Paul with Wolf Blitzer
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Time: 06:20 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Statement on H.Con.Res. 546]]> Tue, 22 Jun 2010 09:00:00 CDT Madame Speaker, I am pleased to support H.Con.Res. 546, legislation commemorating a monumental day in the history of liberty, Juneteenth Independence Day. Juneteenth marks the events of June 19, 1865,when slaves in Galveston, Texas learned that they were at last free men and women. The slaves of Galveston were the last group of slaves to learn of the end of slavery. Thus, Juneteenth represents the end of slavery in America. 

I hope all Americans will take the time to commemorate Juneteenth. Friends of human liberty should celebrate the end of slavery in any country. The end of American slavery is particularly worthy of recognition since there are few more blatant violations of America’s founding principles, as expressed in the Declaration of Independence, than slavery. I am particularly pleased to join the recognition of Juneteenth because I have the privilege of representing Galveston.

I thank the gentleman from Illinois for introducing this resolution, which I am proud to cosponsor. I thank the House leadership for bringing this resolution to the floor, and I urge all of my colleagues to honor the end of slavery by voting for H.Con.Res 546.




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<![CDATA[Statement on H.Con.Res. 546]]> Tue, 22 Jun 2010 09:00:00 CDT Madame Speaker, I am pleased to support H.Con.Res. 546, legislation commemorating a monumental day in the history of liberty, Juneteenth Independence Day. Juneteenth marks the events of June 19, 1865,when slaves in Galveston, Texas learned that they were at last free men and women. The slaves of Galveston were the last group of slaves to learn of the end of slavery. Thus, Juneteenth represents the end of slavery in America. 

I hope all Americans will take the time to commemorate Juneteenth. Friends of human liberty should celebrate the end of slavery in any country. The end of American slavery is particularly worthy of recognition since there are few more blatant violations of America’s founding principles, as expressed in the Declaration of Independence, than slavery. I am particularly pleased to join the recognition of Juneteenth because I have the privilege of representing Galveston.

I thank the gentleman from Illinois for introducing this resolution, which I am proud to cosponsor. I thank the House leadership for bringing this resolution to the floor, and I urge all of my colleagues to honor the end of slavery by voting for H.Con.Res 546.

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<![CDATA[Conference Committee June 16, 2010]]> Wed, 16 Jun 2010 15:11:55 CDT
Congressman Ron Paul testifies before the conference committee on the inclusion of the Fed audit in the financial reform bill
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Time: 05:06 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Congratulations to the Galveston Historical Foundation]]> Wed, 16 Jun 2010 09:00:00 CDT Madam Speaker, on June 26, 2010, the Galveston Historical Foundation will celebrate its acquisition of the historic 1861 U.S. Custom House.  I was pleased to help make this possible by sponsoring legislation, HR 2121, which directed the General Services Administration (GSA) to sell the Custom House to the Galveston Historical Foundation. HR 2121 passed the House by voice vote on September 9, 2009.  It is therefore a great pleasure to extend my congratulations to the Galveston Historical Foundation for acquiring the U.S. Customs House.

The U.S. Custom House is the oldest non-military federal building in Galveston. The two story structure was built in 1861 and has served many important historical functions, including housing the ceremony that officially ended the Civil War in Galveston. In 1917, construction began on a federal courtroom located on the second floor of the U.S. Custom House.  In 1970, the house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and in 1974 it was commemorated as a Historic Custom House by the U.S. Customs Service.

In 1998, the Galveston Historical Foundation entered into a public-private partnership with the federal government that allowed the Galveston Historical Foundation to lease the building from the GSA. Under this agreement, the Galveston Historical Foundation took responsibility for performing renovations on the U.S. Custom House. In 2008, the house was inundated with six feet of flood waters from Hurricane Ike. Fortunately, the Galveston Historical Foundation has been able to complete restoration of the first floor of the Custom House earlier this year.

Madam Speaker, by owning as opposed to leasing, the Galveston Historical Foundation will be able to improve this historical structure for future generations of Texans. It is difficult to think of a more appropriate owner for the U.S. Custom House than the Galveston Historical Foundation.  Founded in 1954, the Galveston Historical Foundation is one of the nation's largest local preservation organizations. Over the last 56 years, this foundation has expanded its mission to encompass community redevelopment, public education, historic preservation advocacy, maritime preservation and stewardship of historic properties. Today, the Galveston Historical Foundation has over 2,000 members representing individuals, families, and businesses across Texas, the U.S., and around the world.

The Galveston Historical Foundation’s accomplishments include the redevelopment of The Strand; the rescue and restoration of the 1877 iron barque the ELISSA; the revitalization of historic residential neighborhoods and creation of historic districts; and the conception of signature events including Dickens on The Strand and the Galveston Historic Homes Tour.

The Galveston Historical Foundation has received numerous awards and honors. For example, they have twice received the National Trust for Historic Preservation's prestigious Honor Award. In 1991, the Galveston Historical Foundation was the first recipient of the Governor's Award for Excellence in Historic Preservation, and in 1995, received the National Trust's first ever award for organizational excellence. The American Institute of Architects has presented the foundation a Citation of Honor for its ongoing contribution to urban design and the quality of life in Galveston. In addition, the Association for Preservation Technology International honored the Galveston Historical Foundation with a Presidential Citation in 2004.

In conclusion, Madame Speaker, I once again congratulate the Galveston Historical Foundation for acquiring the U.S. Custom House, and I extend my thanks to the Galveston Historical Foundation for all they do to preserve Galveston's rich heritage.




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<![CDATA[Statement on House Conference Consideration of Federal Reserve Audit]]> Wed, 16 Jun 2010 09:00:00 CDT The Federal Reserve's actions in bailing out Wall Street through special purpose vehicles and the creation of new credit facilities has provoked a backlash among the American people and among many members of Congress.  Trillions of dollars worth of loans and guarantees have been provided to rich bankers, while Main Street Americans suffocate under harsh taxation and the prospect of higher debt levels and increasing inflation.  These events have awakened many Americans to the problems with the Fed's loose monetary policy, the bubbles it has created in the past, and the potential hyperinflation it might cause in the future.

I am a proponent of eliminating the Federal Reserve System altogether, however I would hope that even supporters of the Fed would agree that as long as the Federal Reserve exists it should be fully audited.  According to current federal law, the Fed's agreements with foreign governments and central banks and, more importantly, its open market and monetary policy operations are exempt from an audit by the General Accounting Office (GAO).  As GAO pointed out the in the 1970s, the last time the issue of an audit really came to the fore, “We do not see how we can satisfactorily audit the Federal Reserve System without authority to examine the largest single category of financial transactions and assets that it has.”[1]  The Fed has such broad power to intervene in the economy and to engage in agreements with foreign governments and central banks that it is unconscionable that such actions are exempt from oversight.

What is needed is stronger audit authority, both looking back at previous market interventions and also ensuring that any future credit facilities or bailout vehicles might be subject to oversight.  This is why I am before you today to advocate that House conferees insist on the language of the Paul-Grayson Federal Reserve audit amendment that passed the House as part of HR 4173 last year.  The Senate-passed language in S. 3217, while an improvement over current law, does not allow for full and future audits.  Chairman Frank's suggested amendment to Title XI rectifies some of the flaws of the Senate language by expanding access to data regarding the Fed's open market and discount window operations.  However, data from credit facilities will only be available once those credit facilities are closed.  Exploiting this loophole, the Fed could keep credit facilities open indefinitely by making a single loan every two years, in order never to have to divulge any lending information.  This would be contrary to the spirit of the language and I hope could be rectified.  The language of the House-passed Paul-Grayson amendment eliminates any loopholes and allows for full oversight of future Fed actions while also ensuring that the full spectrum of the Fed's current intervention into the economy is subject to audit. 

The financial reform legislation creates significant new powers for the Federal Reserve.  Proposals to push the Fed back into the shadows are misguided and harmful.  Congress must maintain oversight of the Fed and ensure the transparency of its credit facilities.  Adopting the Paul-Grayson language would achieve this transparency.

[1]Testimony before the House Committee on Government Operations: Commerce, Consumer and Monetary Affairs Subcommittee; by E.H. Morse, Jr., Assistant Comptroller General. March 2, 1977, page 4. Available at http://archive.gao.gov/f1102a/100319.pdf

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<![CDATA[Congratulations to the Galveston Historical Foundation]]> Wed, 16 Jun 2010 09:00:00 CDT Madam Speaker, on June 26, 2010, the Galveston Historical Foundation will celebrate its acquisition of the historic 1861 U.S. Custom House.  I was pleased to help make this possible by sponsoring legislation, HR 2121, which directed the General Services Administration (GSA) to sell the Custom House to the Galveston Historical Foundation. HR 2121 passed the House by voice vote on September 9, 2009.  It is therefore a great pleasure to extend my congratulations to the Galveston Historical Foundation for acquiring the U.S. Customs House.

The U.S. Custom House is the oldest non-military federal building in Galveston. The two story structure was built in 1861 and has served many important historical functions, including housing the ceremony that officially ended the Civil War in Galveston. In 1917, construction began on a federal courtroom located on the second floor of the U.S. Custom House.  In 1970, the house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and in 1974 it was commemorated as a Historic Custom House by the U.S. Customs Service.

In 1998, the Galveston Historical Foundation entered into a public-private partnership with the federal government that allowed the Galveston Historical Foundation to lease the building from the GSA. Under this agreement, the Galveston Historical Foundation took responsibility for performing renovations on the U.S. Custom House. In 2008, the house was inundated with six feet of flood waters from Hurricane Ike. Fortunately, the Galveston Historical Foundation has been able to complete restoration of the first floor of the Custom House earlier this year.

Madam Speaker, by owning as opposed to leasing, the Galveston Historical Foundation will be able to improve this historical structure for future generations of Texans. It is difficult to think of a more appropriate owner for the U.S. Custom House than the Galveston Historical Foundation.  Founded in 1954, the Galveston Historical Foundation is one of the nation's largest local preservation organizations. Over the last 56 years, this foundation has expanded its mission to encompass community redevelopment, public education, historic preservation advocacy, maritime preservation and stewardship of historic properties. Today, the Galveston Historical Foundation has over 2,000 members representing individuals, families, and businesses across Texas, the U.S., and around the world.

The Galveston Historical Foundation’s accomplishments include the redevelopment of The Strand; the rescue and restoration of the 1877 iron barque the ELISSA; the revitalization of historic residential neighborhoods and creation of historic districts; and the conception of signature events including Dickens on The Strand and the Galveston Historic Homes Tour.

The Galveston Historical Foundation has received numerous awards and honors. For example, they have twice received the National Trust for Historic Preservation's prestigious Honor Award. In 1991, the Galveston Historical Foundation was the first recipient of the Governor's Award for Excellence in Historic Preservation, and in 1995, received the National Trust's first ever award for organizational excellence. The American Institute of Architects has presented the foundation a Citation of Honor for its ongoing contribution to urban design and the quality of life in Galveston. In addition, the Association for Preservation Technology International honored the Galveston Historical Foundation with a Presidential Citation in 2004.

In conclusion, Madame Speaker, I once again congratulate the Galveston Historical Foundation for acquiring the U.S. Custom House, and I extend my thanks to the Galveston Historical Foundation for all they do to preserve Galveston's rich heritage.

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<![CDATA[Statement on House Conference Consideration of Federal Reserve Audit]]> Wed, 16 Jun 2010 09:00:00 CDT The Federal Reserve's actions in bailing out Wall Street through special purpose vehicles and the creation of new credit facilities has provoked a backlash among the American people and among many members of Congress.  Trillions of dollars worth of loans and guarantees have been provided to rich bankers, while Main Street Americans suffocate under harsh taxation and the prospect of higher debt levels and increasing inflation.  These events have awakened many Americans to the problems with the Fed's loose monetary policy, the bubbles it has created in the past, and the potential hyperinflation it might cause in the future.

I am a proponent of eliminating the Federal Reserve System altogether, however I would hope that even supporters of the Fed would agree that as long as the Federal Reserve exists it should be fully audited.  According to current federal law, the Fed's agreements with foreign governments and central banks and, more importantly, its open market and monetary policy operations are exempt from an audit by the General Accounting Office (GAO).  As GAO pointed out the in the 1970s, the last time the issue of an audit really came to the fore, “We do not see how we can satisfactorily audit the Federal Reserve System without authority to examine the largest single category of financial transactions and assets that it has.”[1]  The Fed has such broad power to intervene in the economy and to engage in agreements with foreign governments and central banks that it is unconscionable that such actions are exempt from oversight.

What is needed is stronger audit authority, both looking back at previous market interventions and also ensuring that any future credit facilities or bailout vehicles might be subject to oversight.  This is why I am before you today to advocate that House conferees insist on the language of the Paul-Grayson Federal Reserve audit amendment that passed the House as part of HR 4173 last year.  The Senate-passed language in S. 3217, while an improvement over current law, does not allow for full and future audits.  Chairman Frank's suggested amendment to Title XI rectifies some of the flaws of the Senate language by expanding access to data regarding the Fed's open market and discount window operations.  However, data from credit facilities will only be available once those credit facilities are closed.  Exploiting this loophole, the Fed could keep credit facilities open indefinitely by making a single loan every two years, in order never to have to divulge any lending information.  This would be contrary to the spirit of the language and I hope could be rectified.  The language of the House-passed Paul-Grayson amendment eliminates any loopholes and allows for full oversight of future Fed actions while also ensuring that the full spectrum of the Fed's current intervention into the economy is subject to audit. 

The financial reform legislation creates significant new powers for the Federal Reserve.  Proposals to push the Fed back into the shadows are misguided and harmful.  Congress must maintain oversight of the Fed and ensure the transparency of its credit facilities.  Adopting the Paul-Grayson language would achieve this transparency.

[1]Testimony before the House Committee on Government Operations: Commerce, Consumer and Monetary Affairs Subcommittee; by E.H. Morse, Jr., Assistant Comptroller General. March 2, 1977, page 4. Available at http://archive.gao.gov/f1102a/100319.pdf




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<![CDATA[Street Signs 61510]]> Tue, 15 Jun 2010 15:57:49 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses the oil spill and liability, and gold and conflicts of interest...
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Time: 07:27 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Paul Pleased by Floor Vote on End the Mandate]]> Tue, 15 Jun 2010 09:00:00 CDT Washington, D.C. - Congressman Paul was gratified today when House Republicans forced a vote on the floor to strip the most authoritarian measure from the new healthcare reform law - the requirement that every American buy government-approved health insurance or face stiff IRS penalties. Essentially, today’s resolution adopted Paul’s “End the Mandate” legislation (HR 4995) as a motion to recommit on a related tax bill.

The motion failed with a final vote count of 230 nays and 187 yeas, with a significant number of Democrats crossing party lines to vote yea.
 
Though the “End the Mandate” vote did not succeed in reversing this odious measure, it is a positive sign for renewed and ongoing efforts to prevent America from moving closer to a government-run healthcare system.

“I am pleased to see so many of my colleagues in agreement with me about the health insurance mandate.  With so many in Congress on both sides of the aisle willing to continue this fight, my hope is that we won’t give up until this provision, and many others, are repealed,” stated Congressman Paul.

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<![CDATA[Paul Pleased by Floor Vote on End the Mandate]]> Tue, 15 Jun 2010 09:00:00 CDT Washington, D.C. - Congressman Paul was gratified today when House Republicans forced a vote on the floor to strip the most authoritarian measure from the new healthcare reform law - the requirement that every American buy government-approved health insurance or face stiff IRS penalties. Essentially, today’s resolution adopted Paul’s “End the Mandate” legislation (HR 4995) as a motion to recommit on a related tax bill.

The motion failed with a final vote count of 230 nays and 187 yeas, with a significant number of Democrats crossing party lines to vote yea.
 
Though the “End the Mandate” vote did not succeed in reversing this odious measure, it is a positive sign for renewed and ongoing efforts to prevent America from moving closer to a government-run healthcare system.

“I am pleased to see so many of my colleagues in agreement with me about the health insurance mandate.  With so many in Congress on both sides of the aisle willing to continue this fight, my hope is that we won’t give up until this provision, and many others, are repealed,” stated Congressman Paul.




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<![CDATA[Paul Urges a Full and Complete Audit of the Federal Reserve]]> Thu, 10 Jun 2010 09:00:00 CDT Washington, D.C. - House Conference Committee members, which will reconcile the House and Senate versions of the financial reform bill, have been announced.  Congressman Paul is pleased to note that 15 out of 31 total conferees are cosponsors of HR 1207, his bill to audit the Federal Reserve Bank.

The House-passed version of the financial reform bill contains the basic language of HR 1207 (in the Paul-Grayson amendment).  However, a similar amendment offered by Senator Vitter to the Senate version was rejected by the Senate.  Thus, it is essential that conferees consider adding the undiluted language of the Paul-Grayson amendment when reconciling the Senate and House versions of the Financial Reform Bill.  Only the full language of the Paul-Grayson amendment will insure a thorough, complete, and ongoing audit of the Fed.

“This Financial Reform bill is set to grant sweeping new powers to the Federal Reserve, which has made a mess of our economy.  If my colleagues insist on expanding the power of the Fed, the very least they can do is require the Fed to be transparent rather than secretive in its actions,” stated Congressman Paul.  “Luckily, many of the conferees already have demonstrated their concern about transparency by cosponsoring HR 1207, and hopefully those conferees will insist on full transparency in the conference report.”

The House Conferees are:  (Democrat/Republican) Representatives Frank, Kanjorski, Waters, Maloney, Gutierrez, Watt, Meeks (NY), Moore (KS), Kilroy, Peters, Peterson, Boswell, Waxman, Rush, Conyers, Berman, Towns, Cummings, Velazquez, Shuler, Bachus, Royce, Biggert, Capito, Hensarling, Garrett, Lucas, Barton, Smith (TX), Issa, and Graves.

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<![CDATA[Paul Urges a Full and Complete Audit of the Federal Reserve]]> Thu, 10 Jun 2010 09:00:00 CDT Washington, D.C. - House Conference Committee members, which will reconcile the House and Senate versions of the financial reform bill, have been announced.  Congressman Paul is pleased to note that 15 out of 31 total conferees are cosponsors of HR 1207, his bill to audit the Federal Reserve Bank.

The House-passed version of the financial reform bill contains the basic language of HR 1207 (in the Paul-Grayson amendment).  However, a similar amendment offered by Senator Vitter to the Senate version was rejected by the Senate.  Thus, it is essential that conferees consider adding the undiluted language of the Paul-Grayson amendment when reconciling the Senate and House versions of the Financial Reform Bill.  Only the full language of the Paul-Grayson amendment will insure a thorough, complete, and ongoing audit of the Fed.

“This Financial Reform bill is set to grant sweeping new powers to the Federal Reserve, which has made a mess of our economy.  If my colleagues insist on expanding the power of the Fed, the very least they can do is require the Fed to be transparent rather than secretive in its actions,” stated Congressman Paul.  “Luckily, many of the conferees already have demonstrated their concern about transparency by cosponsoring HR 1207, and hopefully those conferees will insist on full transparency in the conference report.”

The House Conferees are:  (Democrat/Republican) Representatives Frank, Kanjorski, Waters, Maloney, Gutierrez, Watt, Meeks (NY), Moore (KS), Kilroy, Peters, Peterson, Boswell, Waxman, Rush, Conyers, Berman, Towns, Cummings, Velazquez, Shuler, Bachus, Royce, Biggert, Capito, Hensarling, Garrett, Lucas, Barton, Smith (TX), Issa, and Graves.

Senate Conferees are: 

Chris Dodd (D-Conn.)  Tim Johnson (D-S.D.), Jack Reed (D-R.I.), Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.), Richard Shelby (R-Ala.), Bob Corker (R-Tenn.), Mike Crapo (R-Idaho) and Judd Gregg (R-N.H.) Blanche Lincoln (D-Ark.) Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) and Saxby Chambliss (R-Ga.).
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<![CDATA[Varney June 2, 2010]]> Wed, 02 Jun 2010 10:44:04 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses gold with Stuart Varney
Views: 17
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Time: 03:45 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Press Conference May 27, 2010]]> Thu, 27 May 2010 17:48:14 CDT
On the military spending initiative. Held by Rep. Barney Frank, Rep. Ron Paul, Senator Ron Wyden and Rep. Walter Jones.
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<![CDATA[Statement Introducing the Private Option Health Care Act]]> Thu, 27 May 2010 09:00:00 CDT Madam Speaker, I rise to introduce the Private Option Health Care Act. This bill places individuals back in control of health care by replacing the recently passed tax-spend-and-regulate health care law with reforms designed to restore a free market health care system.

  
The major problems with American health care are rooted in government policies that encourage excessive reliance on third-party payers. The excessive reliance on third-party payers removes incentives for individual patients to concern themselves with health care costs. Laws and policies promoting Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) resulted from a desperate attempt to control spiraling costs. However, instead of promoting an efficient health care system, HMOs further took control over health care away from patients and physicians. Furthermore, the third-party payer system creates a two-tier health care system where people whose employers can afford to offer “Cadillac” plans have access to top quality health care, while people unable to obtain health insurance from their employers face obstacles in obtaining quality health care.

 
The Private Option Health Care Act gives control of health care back into the hands of individuals through tax credits and tax deductions, improving Health Savings Accounts and Flexible Savings Accounts. Specifically, the bill:
A.  Provides all Americans with a tax credit for 100% of health care expenses. The tax credit is fully refundable against both income and payroll taxes;
B.  Allows individuals to roll over unused amounts in cafeteria plans and Flexible Savings Accounts (FSA);
C.  Provides a tax credit for premiums for high-deductible insurance policies connected with a Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) and allows seniors to use funds in HSAs to pay for medigap policies;
D. Repeals the 7.5% threshold for the deduction of medical expenses, thus making all medical expenses tax deductible.


This bill also creates a competitive market in heath insurance. It achieves this goal by exercising Congress’s authority under the Commerce Clause to allow individuals to purchase health insurance across state lines. The near-monopoly position many health insurers have in many states and the high prices and inefficiencies that result, is a direct result of state laws limiting people’s ability to buy health insurance that meets their needs, instead of a health insurance plan that meets what state legislators, special interests, and health insurance lobbyists think they should have. Ending this ban will create a truly competitive marketplace in health insurance and give insurance companies more incentive to offer quality insurance at affordable prices.


The Private Option Health Care Act also provides an effective means of ensuring that people harmed during medical treatment receive fair compensation while reducing the burden of costly malpractice litigation on the health care system. The bill achieves this goal by providing a tax credit for negative outcomes insurance purchased before medical treatment. The insurance will provide compensation for any negative outcomes of the medical treatment. Patients can receive this insurance without having to go through lengthy litigation and without having to give away a large portion of their awards to trial lawyers.
Finally, the Private Option Health Care Act also lowers the prices of prescription drugs by reducing barriers to the importation of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved pharmaceuticals. Under my bill, anyone wishing to import a drug simply submits an application to the FDA, which then must approve the drug unless the FDA finds the drug is either not approved for use in the United States or is adulterated or misbranded. This process will make safe and available imported medicines affordable to millions of Americans.  Letting the free market work is the best means of lowering the cost of prescription drugs.

Madam Speaker, the Private Option Health Care Act allows Congress to correct the mistake it made last month by replacing the new health care law with  health care measures that give control to health care to  individuals, instead of the federal government and politically-influential corporations. I urge my colleagues to support this bill.

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<![CDATA[Statement Introducing the Private Option Health Care Act]]> Thu, 27 May 2010 09:00:00 CDT Madam Speaker, I rise to introduce the Private Option Health Care Act. This bill places individuals back in control of health care by replacing the recently passed tax-spend-and-regulate health care law with reforms designed to restore a free market health care system.

  
The major problems with American health care are rooted in government policies that encourage excessive reliance on third-party payers. The excessive reliance on third-party payers removes incentives for individual patients to concern themselves with health care costs. Laws and policies promoting Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) resulted from a desperate attempt to control spiraling costs. However, instead of promoting an efficient health care system, HMOs further took control over health care away from patients and physicians. Furthermore, the third-party payer system creates a two-tier health care system where people whose employers can afford to offer “Cadillac” plans have access to top quality health care, while people unable to obtain health insurance from their employers face obstacles in obtaining quality health care.

 
The Private Option Health Care Act gives control of health care back into the hands of individuals through tax credits and tax deductions, improving Health Savings Accounts and Flexible Savings Accounts. Specifically, the bill:
A.  Provides all Americans with a tax credit for 100% of health care expenses. The tax credit is fully refundable against both income and payroll taxes;
B.  Allows individuals to roll over unused amounts in cafeteria plans and Flexible Savings Accounts (FSA);
C.  Provides a tax credit for premiums for high-deductible insurance policies connected with a Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) and allows seniors to use funds in HSAs to pay for medigap policies;
D. Repeals the 7.5% threshold for the deduction of medical expenses, thus making all medical expenses tax deductible.


This bill also creates a competitive market in heath insurance. It achieves this goal by exercising Congress’s authority under the Commerce Clause to allow individuals to purchase health insurance across state lines. The near-monopoly position many health insurers have in many states and the high prices and inefficiencies that result, is a direct result of state laws limiting people’s ability to buy health insurance that meets their needs, instead of a health insurance plan that meets what state legislators, special interests, and health insurance lobbyists think they should have. Ending this ban will create a truly competitive marketplace in health insurance and give insurance companies more incentive to offer quality insurance at affordable prices.


The Private Option Health Care Act also provides an effective means of ensuring that people harmed during medical treatment receive fair compensation while reducing the burden of costly malpractice litigation on the health care system. The bill achieves this goal by providing a tax credit for negative outcomes insurance purchased before medical treatment. The insurance will provide compensation for any negative outcomes of the medical treatment. Patients can receive this insurance without having to go through lengthy litigation and without having to give away a large portion of their awards to trial lawyers.
Finally, the Private Option Health Care Act also lowers the prices of prescription drugs by reducing barriers to the importation of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved pharmaceuticals. Under my bill, anyone wishing to import a drug simply submits an application to the FDA, which then must approve the drug unless the FDA finds the drug is either not approved for use in the United States or is adulterated or misbranded. This process will make safe and available imported medicines affordable to millions of Americans.  Letting the free market work is the best means of lowering the cost of prescription drugs.

Madam Speaker, the Private Option Health Care Act allows Congress to correct the mistake it made last month by replacing the new health care law with  health care measures that give control to health care to  individuals, instead of the federal government and politically-influential corporations. I urge my colleagues to support this bill.




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<![CDATA[Video Update - Military Spending]]> Wed, 26 May 2010 11:57:30 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses upcoming military expenditures, foreign policy and our economy. Recorded Tuesday May 25, 2010
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Time: 04:20 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Paul Introduces Homeowner Tax Credit Extension and Expansion Act]]> Tue, 25 May 2010 09:00:00 CDT Washington, D.C. - Congressman Ron Paul (TX-14) today introduced legislation to permanently extend the first-time homebuyer tax credit and to make the credit available to people whose homes have been destroyed by a natural disaster, such as a hurricane.

The legislation also makes a number of changes to existing tax credits in order to enhance their usefulness to victims of natural disasters. Specifically, this bill makes casualty loss deductions available to taxpayers who do not itemize, and makes it available to them for five years after the disaster. This legislation also helps people who have lost their jobs because of a natural disaster by making unemployment payments provided under the Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act tax free.

Renewing the first-time home buyer’s credit will help Americans purchase a first home with their own money, instead of having to rely on government-funded or backed programs. 

The other sections of this legislation were inspired by conversations Congressman Paul and his staff had with constituents who had to purchase new homes because Hurricane Ike destroyed their prior homes.  The first-time homebuyer’s tax credit could be of tremendous value to these people, yet the law denies them the credit because they are replacing destroyed homes.

“It is hard to think of a more beneficial or compassionate expansion of the first-time homebuyer tax credit than to make the credit available to those whose homes have been destroyed or damaged by natural disasters,” stated Congressman Paul.  “In addition, the changes to the casualty loss provision will help more taxpayers affected by natural disasters.  Providing tax relief to first-time homebuyers and to those affected by natural disasters should be one of Congress’ top priorities.”

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<![CDATA[Statement Introducing the Homeowner Tax Credit Extension and Expansion Act]]> Tue, 25 May 2010 09:00:00 CDT Madam Speaker, today I introduce legislation to permanently extend the first-time homebuyer tax credit and to make the credit available to people whose homes have been destroyed by a natural disaster, such as a hurricane. The legislation also makes a number of changes to existing tax credits in order to enhance their usefulness to victims of natural disasters. Specifically, this bill makes the casualty loss deductions available to taxpayers who do not itemize and it makes the casualty loss provision available for five years after the disaster. This legislation also helps people who have lost their jobs because of a natural disaster by making unemployment payments provided under the Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act tax free.


Renewing the first-time home buyer’s credit will help Americans purchase a first home with their own money, instead of having to rely on government-funded or backed programs. The other sections of this legislation were inspired by conversations my staff and I had with constituents who had to purchase new homes because Hurricane Ike destroyed their prior homes. The first-time homebuyer’s tax credit could be of tremendous value to these people, yet the law denies them the credit because they are replacing destroyed homes.  My bill not only reinstates that first-time homebuyer’s credit, it also corrects that oversight.


It is hard to think of a more beneficial or compassionate expansion of the first-time homebuyer tax credit than to make the credit available to those whose homes have been destroyed or damaged by natural disasters.  In addition, the changes to the casualty loss provision will help more taxpayers affected by natural disasters. Repealing the taxes on unemployment benefits provided to people affected by nature disasters will ensure those forced onto the unemployment rolls because of a natural disaster are not further burdened by having to pay taxes on their unemployment benefits.  Providing tax relief to first-time homebuyers and to those affected by natural disasters should be one of Congress’ top priorities. I therefore urge my colleagues to join me in supporting this legislation.




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<![CDATA[Statement on H Res 1382]]> Tue, 25 May 2010 09:00:00 CDT I rise in opposition to this legislation not because I do not wish to express sympathy to those killed in the recent sinking of a South Korean naval vessel near the border with North Korea, but rather because I object strongly to the threatening and militaristic language in this resolution. I do not believe Congressional expressions of sympathy for those who have lost their lives should include language that further escalates an already volatile situation on the Korean peninsula. At a time when the United States maintains nearly 30,000 troops in South Korea, serving as a tripwire for an American response should hostilities break out between North and South, this resolution should, if anything, counsel caution and diplomacy rather than urge the US government “to take other appropriate actions in response to the sinking of the ROKS Cheonan and other hostile acts of North Korea.” Further, in reaffirming the United States’ “enduring commitment to the…security of the Republic of Korea,” this resolution signals a US willingness to commit military force should the current escalation in tensions continue between North and South.


It is difficult to imagine a more dangerous or inappropriate time for such statements. I believe this unfortunate incident should instead serve as a wake-up call for the United States to re-assess its military presence in South Korea in particular and Asia in general. Maintaining the US global empire is costing us one trillion dollars per year and is undermining rather than contributing to peace and stability. The North and South Koreans have all the incentive to reach a peaceful solution to their long-standing conflict and have made strides recently in that direction. The US military presence in South Korea some 50 years after the Korean War is an impediment to that progress and should be ended immediately.

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<![CDATA[Paul Introduces Homeowner Tax Credit Extension and Expansion Act]]> Tue, 25 May 2010 09:00:00 CDT Washington, D.C. - Congressman Ron Paul (TX-14) today introduced legislation to permanently extend the first-time homebuyer tax credit and to make the credit available to people whose homes have been destroyed by a natural disaster, such as a hurricane.

The legislation also makes a number of changes to existing tax credits in order to enhance their usefulness to victims of natural disasters. Specifically, this bill makes casualty loss deductions available to taxpayers who do not itemize, and makes it available to them for five years after the disaster. This legislation also helps people who have lost their jobs because of a natural disaster by making unemployment payments provided under the Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act tax free.

Renewing the first-time home buyer’s credit will help Americans purchase a first home with their own money, instead of having to rely on government-funded or backed programs. 

The other sections of this legislation were inspired by conversations Congressman Paul and his staff had with constituents who had to purchase new homes because Hurricane Ike destroyed their prior homes.  The first-time homebuyer’s tax credit could be of tremendous value to these people, yet the law denies them the credit because they are replacing destroyed homes.

“It is hard to think of a more beneficial or compassionate expansion of the first-time homebuyer tax credit than to make the credit available to those whose homes have been destroyed or damaged by natural disasters,” stated Congressman Paul.  “In addition, the changes to the casualty loss provision will help more taxpayers affected by natural disasters.  Providing tax relief to first-time homebuyers and to those affected by natural disasters should be one of Congress’ top priorities.”

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<![CDATA[Statement Introducing the Homeowner Tax Credit Extension and Expansion Act]]> Tue, 25 May 2010 09:00:00 CDT Madam Speaker, today I introduce legislation to permanently extend the first-time homebuyer tax credit and to make the credit available to people whose homes have been destroyed by a natural disaster, such as a hurricane. The legislation also makes a number of changes to existing tax credits in order to enhance their usefulness to victims of natural disasters. Specifically, this bill makes the casualty loss deductions available to taxpayers who do not itemize and it makes the casualty loss provision available for five years after the disaster. This legislation also helps people who have lost their jobs because of a natural disaster by making unemployment payments provided under the Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act tax free.


Renewing the first-time home buyer’s credit will help Americans purchase a first home with their own money, instead of having to rely on government-funded or backed programs. The other sections of this legislation were inspired by conversations my staff and I had with constituents who had to purchase new homes because Hurricane Ike destroyed their prior homes. The first-time homebuyer’s tax credit could be of tremendous value to these people, yet the law denies them the credit because they are replacing destroyed homes.  My bill not only reinstates that first-time homebuyer’s credit, it also corrects that oversight.


It is hard to think of a more beneficial or compassionate expansion of the first-time homebuyer tax credit than to make the credit available to those whose homes have been destroyed or damaged by natural disasters.  In addition, the changes to the casualty loss provision will help more taxpayers affected by natural disasters. Repealing the taxes on unemployment benefits provided to people affected by nature disasters will ensure those forced onto the unemployment rolls because of a natural disaster are not further burdened by having to pay taxes on their unemployment benefits.  Providing tax relief to first-time homebuyers and to those affected by natural disasters should be one of Congress’ top priorities. I therefore urge my colleagues to join me in supporting this legislation.




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<![CDATA[Statement on H Res 1382]]> Tue, 25 May 2010 09:00:00 CDT I rise in opposition to this legislation not because I do not wish to express sympathy to those killed in the recent sinking of a South Korean naval vessel near the border with North Korea, but rather because I object strongly to the threatening and militaristic language in this resolution. I do not believe Congressional expressions of sympathy for those who have lost their lives should include language that further escalates an already volatile situation on the Korean peninsula. At a time when the United States maintains nearly 30,000 troops in South Korea, serving as a tripwire for an American response should hostilities break out between North and South, this resolution should, if anything, counsel caution and diplomacy rather than urge the US government “to take other appropriate actions in response to the sinking of the ROKS Cheonan and other hostile acts of North Korea.” Further, in reaffirming the United States’ “enduring commitment to the…security of the Republic of Korea,” this resolution signals a US willingness to commit military force should the current escalation in tensions continue between North and South.


It is difficult to imagine a more dangerous or inappropriate time for such statements. I believe this unfortunate incident should instead serve as a wake-up call for the United States to re-assess its military presence in South Korea in particular and Asia in general. Maintaining the US global empire is costing us one trillion dollars per year and is undermining rather than contributing to peace and stability. The North and South Koreans have all the incentive to reach a peaceful solution to their long-standing conflict and have made strides recently in that direction. The US military presence in South Korea some 50 years after the Korean War is an impediment to that progress and should be ended immediately.

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<![CDATA[Varney May 21]]> Fri, 21 May 2010 10:20:01 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses gold and the markets with Stuart Varney on Fox Business
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0 ratings
Time: 02:37 More in News & Politics
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<![CDATA[Hearing May 20]]> Thu, 20 May 2010 17:31:04 CDT
Congressman Ron Paul at the Financial Services Subcommittee on International Monetary Policy & Trade & Domestic Monetary Policy & Technology entitled The Role of the International Monetary Fund and Federal Reserve in Stabilizing Europe
Views: 3
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Time: 09:15 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Paul Disappointed by Senate's Failure to Support a Full Audit of Fed]]> Tue, 11 May 2010 09:00:00 CDT Washington, D.C. - Congressman Ron Paul (TX-14) today expressed disappointment that the Senate failed to pass an amendment offered by Senator Vitter (amending the Senate financial reform bill), which included the express language of Congressman Paul’s landmark “Audit the Fed” legislation.  Paul’s legislation passed by a large margin in the House of Representatives last fall as part of the House financial reform bill, and Senator Vitter’s amendment would have paved the way for a full and ongoing audit of all of the Federal Reserve’s lending and monetary policy activity.

However, the Vitter amendment was supported by over 1/3 of the Senate, and the Sanders amendment (calling for disclosure of how approximately $2 trillion of Federal Reserve credit facilities were dispersed) passed unanimously today in the Senate.  Therefore Paul remains hopeful that momentum is shifting and the days of Federal Reserve secrecy are coming to an end.

“The 37 votes our measure received in the Senate represent a strong step in our continuing work for full Federal Reserve transparency.  In addition, the passage of the Sanders Amendment is a victory for taxpayers, who will finally know who received $2 trillion of their money,” stated Congressman Paul.  “The Fed is no longer an untouchable monolith.  It can no longer take for granted its absolute power to create and give away public money at will, with no true accountability.  With strong support in the Senate, the House, and especially among the public, more victories for full transparency lie ahead.”

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<![CDATA[Paul Disappointed by Senate's Failure to Support a Full Audit of Fed]]> Tue, 11 May 2010 09:00:00 CDT Washington, D.C. - Congressman Ron Paul (TX-14) today expressed disappointment that the Senate failed to pass an amendment offered by Senator Vitter (amending the Senate financial reform bill), which included the express language of Congressman Paul’s landmark “Audit the Fed” legislation.  Paul’s legislation passed by a large margin in the House of Representatives last fall as part of the House financial reform bill, and Senator Vitter’s amendment would have paved the way for a full and ongoing audit of all of the Federal Reserve’s lending and monetary policy activity.

However, the Vitter amendment was supported by over 1/3 of the Senate, and the Sanders amendment (calling for disclosure of how approximately $2 trillion of Federal Reserve credit facilities were dispersed) passed unanimously today in the Senate.  Therefore Paul remains hopeful that momentum is shifting and the days of Federal Reserve secrecy are coming to an end.

“The 37 votes our measure received in the Senate represent a strong step in our continuing work for full Federal Reserve transparency.  In addition, the passage of the Sanders Amendment is a victory for taxpayers, who will finally know who received $2 trillion of their money,” stated Congressman Paul.  “The Fed is no longer an untouchable monolith.  It can no longer take for granted its absolute power to create and give away public money at will, with no true accountability.  With strong support in the Senate, the House, and especially among the public, more victories for full transparency lie ahead.”

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<![CDATA[Fox Business May10]]> Mon, 10 May 2010 10:34:00 CDT
on the global financial bailout of Greece and the American taxpayer.
Views: 0
0 ratings
Time: 02:59 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Congressman Paul Supports Vitter Amendment to Dodd Bill]]> Fri, 07 May 2010 09:00:00 CDT Washington, D.C. - Congressman Ron Paul (TX-14) issues the following statement in regard to the Vitter Amendment:


“I welcome Senator David Vitter's introduction of an amendment to the Senate financial reform bill that would allow the General Accounting Office to conduct a full audit of the Federal Reserve System. The audit language had originally been in an amendment introduced by Senator Bernie Sanders until being removed after a Senate compromise.


Senator Sanders' amendment still contains important disclosure requirements but stops short of the full audit called for in my amendment that passed the House last fall. Senator Vitter's amendment calling for a full audit would give GAO the authority it needs to ensure that the Fed is fully transparent and I have been told that it will be voted on next Tuesday. The American people deserve to know what the Fed has been up to and how their Senators stand on the issue of a full audit.”

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<![CDATA[Congressman Paul Supports Vitter Amendment to Dodd Bill]]> Fri, 07 May 2010 09:00:00 CDT Washington, D.C. - Congressman Ron Paul (TX-14) issues the following statement in regard to the Vitter Amendment:


“I welcome Senator David Vitter's introduction of an amendment to the Senate financial reform bill that would allow the General Accounting Office to conduct a full audit of the Federal Reserve System. The audit language had originally been in an amendment introduced by Senator Bernie Sanders until being removed after a Senate compromise.


Senator Sanders' amendment still contains important disclosure requirements but stops short of the full audit called for in my amendment that passed the House last fall. Senator Vitter's amendment calling for a full audit would give GAO the authority it needs to ensure that the Fed is fully transparent and I have been told that it will be voted on next Tuesday. The American people deserve to know what the Fed has been up to and how their Senators stand on the issue of a full audit.”

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<![CDATA[Fox on Greece]]> Thu, 06 May 2010 14:54:35 CDT
Congressman Paul discusses the crisis in Greece with Megyn Kelly, and how it relates to the United States.
Views: 3
0 ratings
Time: 05:19 More in News & Politics



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<![CDATA[Senate Sellout Threatens Congressman Paul's Audit the Fed Bill]]> Thu, 06 May 2010 09:00:00 CDT Washington, D.C. - Congressman Ron Paul (TX-14) expressed disappointment that his landmark legislation to audit the Federal Reserve Bank- which passed by a wide margin in the House Financial Services committee and has over 319 House co-sponsors- was threatened by a compromise in the Senate today. 

More specifically, Paul’s language (passed by the House) to audit the Federal Reserve has been stripped from the Sanders Amendment to the Senate financial reform bill.  Instead, the Sanders Amendment now contains softer compromise language that exempts monetary policy decisions, discount window operations, and agreements with foreign central banks from Government Accounting Office (“GAO”) audit. 

This is of particular concern when several countries such as Greece, Portugal, and Spain are seeking IMF help in the midst of their financial crises, because American taxpayers provide fully 17% of all IMF funding.

“Taxpayers are weary of bailing out privileged banks and corporations in the US, and we certainly cannot afford to bail out entire countries.  The possibility of this happening behind a veil of Federal Reserve secrecy is not acceptable,” stated Congressman Paul.  “This compromise language represents a huge missed opportunity by Congress to finally make the Fed accountable for trillions of taxpayer dollars it administers.  Full transparency, via a full GAO audit, is the only acceptable option.  However, I am grateful to Senator Vitter for offering the original full audit language in an alternative amendment to the bill.”

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<![CDATA[Statement on Hemp History Week]]> Thu, 06 May 2010 09:00:00 CDT Madam Speaker, I rise to speak about Hemp History Week.  To celebrate the American heritage of growing industrial hemp, the Hemp Industries Association, Vote Hemp, several American manufacturers, and allied companies and organizations have declared May 17 to May 23 to be Hemp History Week.  Throughout the week, people will recognize America’s legacy of industrial hemp farming and call for reinstating respect for farmers’ basic right to grow industrial hemp.

Industrial hemp was legally grown throughout our country for many years.  In fact, George Washington and Thomas Jefferson grew industrial hemp and used it to make cloth.  During World War II, the federal government encouraged American farmers to grow hemp to help the war effort.

Despite industrial hemp farming being an important part of American history, the federal government has banned cultivation of this crop. In every other industrialized country, industrial hemp, defined to contain less than 0.3 percent THC--the psychoactive chemical found in marijuana, may be legally grown.  Nobody can be psychologically affected by consuming industrial hemp.  Unfortunately, because of a federal policy that does not distinguish between growing industrial hemp and growing marijuana, all hemp products and materials must be imported.  The result is high prices, outsourced jobs, and lost opportunities for American manufacturing.

Reintroducing industrial hemp farming in the United States would bring jobs to communities struggling in today’s economy, provide American farmers with another crop alternative, and encourage the development of hemp processing factories near American hemp farming.

Industrial hemp is used in many products.  For example, industrial hemp is used in protein supplements, non-dairy milk, and frozen desserts.  Hemp flour is in breads, crackers, chips, dips, and dressings. Hemp seeds may be eaten plain or added to prepared foods.  Additionally, hemp oil is used in a number of cosmetic and body care products, and hemp fiber is used in cloths.  Industrial hemp is also present in bio-composite materials used in buildings and automobiles.

I first introduced the Industrial Hemp Farming Act (HR 1866) five years ago to end the federal government’s ban on American farmers growing industrial hemp.  In this time, the industrial hemp industry has grown much larger.  Despite its American history, industrial hemp is the only crop that we can buy and sell but not farm in the United States.  The federal government should change the law to allow American farmers grow this profitable crop as American farmers have through most of our nation’s history.  Please cosponsor the Industrial Hemp Farming Act and join me in celebrating Hemp History Week.

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<![CDATA[Senate Sellout Threatens Congressman Paul's Audit the Fed Bill]]> Thu, 06 May 2010 09:00:00 CDT Washington, D.C. - Congressman Ron Paul (TX-14) expressed disappointment that his landmark legislation to audit the Federal Reserve Bank- which passed by a wide margin in the House Financial Services committee and has over 319 House co-sponsors- was threatened by a compromise in the Senate today. 

More specifically, Paul’s language (passed by the House) to audit the Federal Reserve has been stripped from the Sanders Amendment to the Senate financial reform bill.  Instead, the Sanders Amendment now contains softer compromise language that exempts monetary policy decisions, discount window operations, and agreements with foreign central banks from Government Accounting Office (“GAO”) audit. 

This is of particular concern when several countries such as Greece, Portugal, and Spain are seeking IMF help in the midst of their financial crises, because American taxpayers provide fully 17% of all IMF funding.

“Taxpayers are weary of bailing out privileged banks and corporations in the US, and we certainly cannot afford to bail out entire countries.  The possibility of this happening behind a veil of Federal Reserve secrecy is not acceptable,” stated Congressman Paul.  “This compromise language represents a huge missed opportunity by Congress to finally make the Fed accountable for trillions of taxpayer dollars it administers.  Full transparency, via a full GAO audit, is the only acceptable option.  However, I am grateful to Senator Vitter for offering the original full audit language in an alternative amendment to the bill.”




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<![CDATA[Statement on Hemp History Week]]> Thu, 06 May 2010 09:00:00 CDT Madam Speaker, I rise to speak about Hemp History Week.  To celebrate the American heritage of growing industrial hemp, the Hemp Industries Association, Vote Hemp, several American manufacturers, and allied companies and organizations have declared May 17 to May 23 to be Hemp History Week.  Throughout the week, people will recognize America’s legacy of industrial hemp farming and call for reinstating respect for farmers’ basic right to grow industrial hemp.

Industrial hemp was legally grown throughout our country for many years.  In fact, George Washington and Thomas Jefferson grew industrial hemp and used it to make cloth.  During World War II, the federal government encouraged American farmers to grow hemp to help the war effort.

Despite industrial hemp farming being an important part of American history, the federal government has banned cultivation of this crop. In every other industrialized country, industrial hemp, defined to contain less than 0.3 percent THC--the psychoactive chemical found in marijuana, may be legally grown.  Nobody can be psychologically affected by consuming industrial hemp.  Unfortunately, because of a federal policy that does not distinguish between growing industrial hemp and growing marijuana, all hemp products and materials must be imported.  The result is high prices, outsourced jobs, and lost opportunities for American manufacturing.

Reintroducing industrial hemp farming in the United States would bring jobs to communities struggling in today’s economy, provide American farmers with another crop alternative, and encourage the development of hemp processing factories near American hemp farming.

Industrial hemp is used in many products.  For example, industrial hemp is used in protein supplements, non-dairy milk, and frozen desserts.  Hemp flour is in breads, crackers, chips, dips, and dressings. Hemp seeds may be eaten plain or added to prepared foods.  Additionally, hemp oil is used in a number of cosmetic and body care products, and hemp fiber is used in cloths.  Industrial hemp is also present in bio-composite materials used in buildings and automobiles.

I first introduced the Industrial Hemp Farming Act (HR 1866) five years ago to end the federal government’s ban on American farmers growing industrial hemp.  In this time, the industrial hemp industry has grown much larger.  Despite its American history, industrial hemp is the only crop that we can buy and sell but not farm in the United States.  The federal government should change the law to allow American farmers grow this profitable crop as American farmers have through most of our nation’s history.  Please cosponsor the Industrial Hemp Farming Act and join me in celebrating Hemp History Week.

]]>